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On the Crazy Horse Trail — enticements to return again in other seasons

Spotting a Snapping turtle on the Crazy Horse Trail On a humid but clear early fall afternoon, 18 Macnamara members and guests walked the Crazy Horse Trail near Carp, led by Trail team leader Brian Roadhouse.

Time did not permit us visiting the beaver pond, but any disappointment left when we realized that with the conspicuously dry conditions around us, the “wetland” areas were largely dried up.  All the same, we had more than two hours of fine discoveries.

We saw how the area has two distinctive types of rock formation, each supporting different types of vegetation.  The first, marble, was encountered soon into our walk and soon followed by granite-like rock that extended over most of the trail.

As we progressed, Brian pointed out the various trees and the Lichen—Coral and Reindeer, for instance—on rock outcrops and the patches of Clubmosses ( Lychopodium) — among them, Pine, Spruce and Cedar growing nearby.

We moved up and down, and around the trail, crunching underfoot Oak branches and leaves scattered on the forest floor—brought down by squirrels that devoured the acorns.

The chirping of grey tree frogs carried in the light breeze; while these remained hidden, we did spot leopard frogs partially concealed under leaves on the forest floor.

We could imagine the areas coming to life each year with an abundance of spring ephemerals followed by the fens with their orchids. Small stands of Ladies’ Tresses were still visible on this visit.

We were delighted to spot a Snapping turtle (a species of special concern) and, then, turning a corner, a wet area with clearly defined turtle tracks — enticements to bring us back again in other seasons.

Photos by Karen Runtz

Images from the Crazy Horse Trail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PHOTOS:

Crazy Horse Trail guide Brian Roadhouse provides background on the Crazy Horse Trail. We saw how the area has two distinctive types of rock formation, each supporting different types of vegetation.

An endangered species in Ontario, the Butternut trees are susceptible to a fungal disease called Butternut Canker.

Small stands of Ladies’ Tresses were still visible

The spiny outer layer of this Peeling Puffball brought to mind golf balls

Patches of Clubmosses on rock outcrops

Turtle tracks

Autumn Meadowhawk tbc

“Bird’s Foot”