Events & Meetings

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free! Annual General Meeting may be an exception. Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.  
  • Sat
    03
    Oct
    2020
    9:00 AM - noon (approx.) Macnamara Trail Head (McNab Street, Arnprior)

    Members Only Fungi Outing to Mac Trail with Jonathan Mack and Lynn Ovenden

    Saturday October 3rd ; Rain Date (only if rainfall is heavy) Sunday October 4th

    9:00 AM – approximately 12:00 PM (noon)

    Meeting Location: Macnamara Trail Head (McNab St., Arnprior).

    (please note that there are no bathroom facilities)

    From Highway 417 exit at County Road 29 (exit 180) and head north to Madawaska Boulevard. Turn left onto Madawaska Boulevard and continue for 1km to MacNab Street. Turn right on McNab Street (just after Rona) and look for the Macnamara Trail parking lot on the right after the entrance to the Nylene Canada plant.

    Leaders:  Jonathan Mack and Lynn Ovenden

    Jonathan is an amateur mycologist who has been interested in the identification of mushrooms for a bit more than 10 years now.  He is currently a student at Carleton University doing his Master thesis focusing on microfungi.  While microfungi are his main research area, he is quite capable of identifying many of the more typical mushrooms as well. He is also interested in most other organisms, with a preference for birds and insects (specifically moths).  Jonathan has provided his link for his iNaturalist account for anyone interested. https://www.inaturalist.org/people/jonathan_mack

    Lynn is a biologist who suddenly decided, late in life about 10 years ago, to learn about mushrooms. She bought a field guide, attended Richard Aaron's Fabulous Fall Fungi course at Queens University Biological Station, started making notes and spore prints of mushrooms she found, and joined a mushroom club. Then she bought more books and attended weekend forays (with lectures!) of other amateur groups. She'll eat a few species but mostly it's the thrill of trying to identify them and sharing photos on iNaturalist.

    The level of difficulty for this outing is a 2 out of 5 and will run even if there is light rain (some fungi become fabulously colourful in those conditions).  While other things of interest won’t be ignored, it is hoped that rain during the week will produce an ample crop of fungi to keep us busy.

    Solid, comfortable closed toe footwear (While on your own you may be accustomed to wearing sandals on hikes, as a courtesy to the group, please do not risk a foot injury when on a group outing.) and ability to walk for the duration of the hike is required.  You could bring a portable camp stool for this one as we will be stopping frequently. Please bring water to drink, sunscreen, bug spray and/or bug jacket and dress for the weather with long pants tucked into your socks (poison ivy and ticks).  Binoculars, a small mirror for looking under the fungi, a hand lens (small personal magnifying glass), and a camera is always a good idea if you have one.

    A note about Covid:  Participant numbers will be restricted to allow for a safe outing so register early and only if you truly know you can come.  You may register yourself and anyone in your own household only.  Participation will be on a first come first registered basis.  Confirmation emails will be sent.

    We will be maintaining physical distancing requirements.  Please bring a non-medical mask as this will be required. Please do not come if you are ill or have come in contact with someone who has tested positive for Covid 19.  Notification of cancellation as soon as possible would be appreciated.

    Register at events@mfnc.ca (please include your full name) no later than Wednesday September 30th.

    If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

  • Tue
    06
    Oct
    2020
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting

    Our Presenter:

    Art Goldsmith, a long-standing member of the MFNC, worked at Parks Canada and Environment Canada for many years. As part of the Biodiversity Convention Team, he assisted in the establishment of the UN Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity. His boyhood interest in nature developed into an understanding of and lifetime commitment to ecology and conservation.

    The Presentation:

    The comparative diversity tour will begin on the east and west coasts of Canada, Alaska, and Yukon, where species are adapted to the varying ecosystems, including many birds which we sometimes see migrating. Species similar to those in our area, and some species we never see are also featured. On our travels, we'll see how diversity tends to skyrocket as we go south and into nearshore marine ecosystems. Speciation is of great interest to ecologists and there are some great courses at Carleton and Queen's if you wish to go deeper into the topic.

    European species also show so many similarities, and differences. The similarities point to our continents being joined at some point. We will venture to Spain, where some astonishing efforts are being made to conserve biodiversity. Photos of key and noteworthy species will be presented.

    The last part of the presentation will take us from the more biodiverse American south back home along the Atlantic coast and inland to our Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Region where the Eastern Flyway for migrating birds is featured. We will also enjoy seeing ecological changes as one goes from South to North. Just for fun, and because it is something I only know about because of Michael, Bergmann's rule will be explored.

    Biography:

    Art Goldsmith is a long standing member of the MFNC and worked at Parks Canada and Environment Canada for many years, particularly with the Biodiversity Convention Team where he assisted in the establishment of the UN Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity. This is very boring as Art said!

    Art’s boyhood interest in nature developed into an understanding of ecology and conservation. His career in Parks and Environment Canada occasionally interfered with his studies of wilderness. However, Art is now dedicated to his own conservation and ecological studies and his exploits can now be followed at: artnatureculture.blogspot.com.

     

  • Tue
    03
    Nov
    2020
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Our Presenter:

    Alberto Suarez-Esteban is a biologist by training and a passionate naturalist. He has studied a variety of topics and taxa (plants, birds, mammals), always with a focus on conservation and sustainability.

    The Presentation:

    Ecosystems are very much like a car's engine: they have multiple components (species, for example) that are structured in a particular way and provide functions. When we humans build roads, we do not only affect certain species, but also the structure and the functions of the ecosystem. All these changes combined can lead to a much different landscape. Join Alberto Suarez-Esteban on a trip to southern Spain to unravel the unexpected consequences of roads in a Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Biography:

    Alberto Suarez-Esteban is a biologist by training and a passionate naturalist. He loves teaching "Ecosystem and Environmental Change" at Carleton University, and he is developing an organic market garden called Nature's Apprentice Farm in Pakenham. Alberto completed his PhD in Spain and moved to the Yukon shortly after, where he worked as a researcher and instructor for 4 years. He has studied a variety of topics and taxa (plants, birds, mammals), always with a focus on conservation and sustainability. To learn more about Alberto, please visit https://sites.google.com/view/albertosuarezesteban

  • Tue
    01
    Dec
    2020
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting - Details to follow

    JP Thonney will present an overview of lake evolution over time including effects of human activity - organic inputs, invasives and microplastics. Details to follow

  • Tue
    02
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Donna Naughton, CMN (ret'd) will present an overview of Canadian mammals - details to follow.

    Please see: The Natural History of Canadian Mammals – Illustrated, Oct. 9 2012, by Donna Naughton

  • Tue
    06
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Our Presenter:

    Michael Allan is a Wildlife Research Technician with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and has worked as a wildlife research technician/biologist for over 30 years. He has two college diplomas: an Environmental Resource Field Technician diploma from Loyalist College in Belleville and a Fish and Wildlife Technician diploma from Fleming College in Lindsay. He also completed an Honours BSc degree in biology/environmental science and an MSc in Environmental and Life Sciences from Trent University.

    The Presentation:

    Mike will present on the history of elk in North America - species and range and on the restoration of elk in Ontario. He will provide an update on the Bancroft-North Hastings (BNH) elk herd and present some of the research findings on the herd. Mike will discuss past, current and future survey methods employed and will provide the current status of elk in release areas.

    Biography:

    Michael Allan is a Wildlife Research Technician with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. He has worked as a wildlife research technician/biologist for over 30 years.  He completed his Master of Science on elk calving site selection and fidelity on the Bancroft North Hastings elk herd and has been involved with research on this herd since 2000.  He has also been working on canine research and management and assisted in organizing a cooperative international plan to relocate wolves successfully from Michipicoten Island, Ontario to Isle Royale in Michigan, USA.  He has conducted wildlife research on many species of animals including big game - elk, moose, deer, caribou, black bears, polar bears and wolves - and has considerable expertise in methods associated in controlling rabies in raccoon populations. Mike is currently working on developing a suitable method for aerial inventory survey of elk in the Bancroft North Hastings herd.

    He possesses two college diplomas, an Environmental Resource Field Technician diploma from Loyalist College in Belleville and a Fish and Wildlife Technician diploma from Fleming College in Lindsay.  He completed his Honour’s undergrad degree in biology/environmental science and his Master of Science degree in Environmental and Life Sciences from Trent University.