Events & Meetings

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free! Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.  
  • Sat
    27
    Apr
    2019
    1pm-4pmTo be determined

    Leader: Matt Ellerbeck

    Check here later in April for information about the exact location and meeting place .  Matt will be exploring various ponds in the Club's area.

    Join Frog Conservationist, Matt Ellerbeck, and members of the club, as we search for a variety of frogs and other amphibians and reptiles! Learn how to properly locate and observe these animals. Wear your highest rubber boots, if you have some, dress warmly, bring a flashlight and a net if you have one. Bring the kids. This will be a very "kid-friendly" event.  Register at events@mfnc.ca ...for more information see: www.saveallfrogs.com

  • Sun
    05
    May
    2019
    2:00 pmCantley, Quebec

    Leader:  Dr. David Sharpe, GSC Geologist.  David spoke to our club last year on glaciation.

    Meet:  Park on Chemin St-Andrew, just south of the quarry on the west side of highway 307, Cantley.   The event will go on rain or shine.

    The Cantley quarry is remarkable--beautiful and a very important geological site in our area, adding a great deal of information to the study of glaciation.  Below is the abstract from a paper written about the site (Sharpe, D.R. and Le duc, G., 2018 ) for a CANQUA/AMQUA conference in Ottawa.

    Several erosional forms on bedrock at Cantley, Quebec, differ from well-known glacial abrasion forms. The forms consist of obstacle marks, hollows, depressions, and channels, which are defined by sharp rims, smooth inner surfaces, divergent flow features, and remnant ridges. These forms are found on lee, lateral, and overhung rock surfaces. This assemblage of features is best explained by differential erosion produced by separation eddies along lines of flow reattachment. Rapid, sediment-laden, turbulent, subglacial melt-water flows likely produced the forms by corrasion and cavitation erosion. 

    Ice-abrasion forms, such as striations, and plucked forms such as gouges and crescentic fractures are also present at the Cantley site. Pitted forms, polishing, and carbonate precipitate are also present. The occurrence of abrasion, pitting, polishing, and lee-side carbonate precipitate with meltwater forms suggests that the meltwater flows were subglacial. Decoupling of abrading ice from its bed temporarily suspended glacial abrasion, whereas reattachment of ice to the bed may have led to the rounding of sharp edges and the production of striations superposed on the glaciofluvial forms. 

    The association of forms produced both by glaciofluvial erosion and ice abrasion suggests that the glacier was alternately lifted from, and reattached to, the bed during periodic subglacial floods. These floods may have affected the dynamics of the ice sheet, and depositional sequences related to high-energy meltwater outbursts were probably deposited in adjacent basins.

    Registration is limited and more information will be provided to registrants.  Please register at events@mfnc.ca

     

  • Tue
    07
    May
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Brian Carson is an enthusiastic plant hunter and obsessed gardener who enjoys astonishing fellow gardeners with his floral treasures. In the Ottawa region he lectures frequently, leads field trips and conducts workshops.

    The Presentation:

    Not all treasures are silver and gold. In recent years, more and more floral gems are being found here in the Ottawa Valley: elusive double Trilliums, incredible colored Trillium variants, revered double hepaticas, gargantuan bloodroots and many more marvelous beauties. The presentation, a virtual tour of the valley, will cover the discovery of these treasures. Journey with Brian for a while as he unveils some of the floral gems found hiding in plain sight - perhaps, in a forest near you.

    Biography:

    Brian Carson’s has had a varied career that includes farming, market gardening, underwater salvaging, masonry contracting, geophysics and mine supervision. As an enthusiastic plant hunter and obsessed gardener he enjoys astonishing fellow gardeners with his floral treasures. In the Ottawa region Brian lectures frequently, leads field trips and conducts workshops. Last year he received the prestigious Award of Merit from the Ontario Horticultural Association for his work with Trilliums.

    Brian is past president of the Manotick Horticultural Society and the Barrhaven Garden Club and vice president for the Ottawa Valley Rock Garden Society. He is a member of the Royal Horticultural Society, the North American Rock Garden Society, the Scottish Rock Garden Society, the Ottawa Cactus and Succulent Group and the Macnamara Field Naturalists’ Club.

    In recent years, he has had incredible luck as an amateur plant explorer discovering a colony of new terrestrial orchids for North America, many marvellous mutations of our native wildflowers, and right here in the Ottawa Valley, an ever increasing treasure trove of the elusive double Trilliums.

    Brian’s current passions of plant hunting and photography have brought international recognition to the Ottawa Valley for its double Trilliums.

    See also: A virtual tour of rare Ottawa Valley trillium and other marvellous mutations

  • Sat
    11
    May
    2019
    10:00 amMacnamara Trail

    Volunteers needed!  Help “spruce up” the Macnamara trailhead by planting native shrubs on Saturday, 11 May between 10 am and 12 noon.  Bring a shovel, a bucket, a garbage bag, and lopers and/or pruners.  We need a couple of wheelbarrows too. Wear sturdy boots.  Park at the trailhead lot on McNab Street.  We’ll plant rain or shine unless it’s pouring.  Please register by emailing trail@mfnc.ca so we know how many are coming and can contact you if we have to cancel.

    Last year our club received a grant to help refresh the Macnamara Trail.  Planting native shrubs at the trailhead to replace invasive species like buckthorn is one of our first trail refresh activities.

    We did some clean-up of the trailhead area in the fall, but our first task will be to remove garbage, pull out emerging garlic mustard and dig up or prune back any buckthorn we may have missed.  Then we will plant 23 shrubs, water them well, and cover them with mulch.

    We've selected native flowering shrubs that produce blooms for pollinators and berries for wildlife across the seasons:

      • Canada Plum (Prunus nigra) - This is one of our earliest flowering shrubs, lighting up bare rural hedgerows with it white blossoms in early May before it and other plants leaf out.  Its flowers provide food for early pollinators. The edible fruit is yellowish-red to red.  Fall foliage is bright orange to pink to red.  We’ll be planting this along the edges of the parking lot
      • Canada Elderberry (Sambucus canadensis) - Elderberry flowers in July with licorice-smelling dome-shaped flower heads that are a favourite of bees and butterflies.  Birds and deer eat the black fruit as soon as it ripens.  Elderberry spreads via underground runners, putting up new canes as it “walks” across the landscape so we’ll give these plants lots of room to grow.
      • Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago) - Nannyberry has showy, white flat year flower heads in late May that become clusters of drooping blue-black fruit in late summer.  It likes damp conditions and grow quite big so we’ll place it near the back.
      • Alternate-leaf Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia) - This dogwood is an attractive tree/shrub that should be more widely planted in our own gardens. It blooms in late May/early June under open tree canopies and produces blue-black fruit.

    Canada Plum, Nannyberry, and Alternate-leaf Dogwood are all currently found on the Macnamara Trail.

    Prunus nigra - Canada Plum

    Prunus nigra - Canada Plum

     

  • Sat
    11
    May
    2019
    all dayBrighton, ON

    Leader:  Doug McRae

    This will be an all-day outing in the park where we will watch for spring migrants. There should be a good variety of warblers by this time of year, along with ducks and many other species of interest. We will begin early in the morning so it is advisable to stay in the area overnight Friday. There are accommodations nearby and camping is available in the park. The group will be limited to 25 members so please register early at events@mfnc.ca and questions may be sent to this same address.  More information will be provided to registrants.

  • Tue
    04
    Jun
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Cory Harris is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa where he studies the ethnobotany, pharmacology and chemical ecology of plants with an emphasis on native Canadian species used for food and medicine.

    The Presentation:

    Wild plants have provided food and medicine to the peoples of North America, from pre-colonial times to the present day. In this talk, Dr. Harris will introduce concepts in ethnobotany - the study of how people interact with plants - to offer a new perspective on some of the well and lesser known plants of Ontario. Drawing on research in the field and the lab, I will discuss what's good for your health, what's good for your belly, and what's best left alone.

    Biography:

    Cory Harris is an Associate Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa. His research integrates laboratory, field and community-based approaches to study the ethnobotany, pharmacology and chemical ecology of plants with an emphasis on native Canadian species used for food and medicine. Working with Indigenous communities, patients and practitioners, as well as private sector partners, his team applies a “benchtop to community practice” approach to support the safe and effective use of natural products and alternative medicines.