Events & Meetings

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free! Annual General Meeting may be an exception. Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.  
  • Tue
    03
    Nov
    2020
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Our Presenter:

    Alberto Suarez-Esteban is a biologist by training and a passionate naturalist. He has studied a variety of topics and taxa (plants, birds, mammals), always with a focus on conservation and sustainability.

    The Presentation:

    Ecosystems are very much like a car's engine: they have multiple components (species, for example) that are structured in a particular way and provide functions. When we humans build roads, we do not only affect certain species, but also the structure and the functions of the ecosystem. All these changes combined can lead to a much different landscape. Join Alberto Suarez-Esteban on a trip to southern Spain to unravel the unexpected consequences of roads in a Mediterranean ecosystem.

    Biography:

    Alberto Suarez-Esteban is a biologist by training and a passionate naturalist. He loves teaching "Ecosystem and Environmental Change" at Carleton University, and he is developing an organic market garden called Nature's Apprentice Farm in Pakenham. Alberto completed his PhD in Spain and moved to the Yukon shortly after, where he worked as a researcher and instructor for 4 years. He has studied a variety of topics and taxa (plants, birds, mammals), always with a focus on conservation and sustainability. To learn more about Alberto, please visit https://sites.google.com/view/albertosuarezesteban

  • Sat
    07
    Nov
    2020
    10:00 am - 12:00 pmGillies Grove - trailhead on Ottawa Street

    Saturday 7 November;

    10:00 AM – approximately 12:00 PM (noon)

    Meeting Location: At the Gillies Grove trailhead, dead end of Ottawa Street in Arnprior. Map with directions will be sent to registered participants.

    (please note that there are no bathroom facilities)

    Leaders:  Roger Bird and David Major

    Roger Bird is a retired journalist, and a hiker and birder. In a varied career he was once editor of the World Federation of Science Journalists website and a professor in the School of Journalism at Carleton University.

    David Major was born in 1939 Halifax and grew up on the boundary of Halifax where across the street was a cow field and behind, was a virtually endless forest of trees, copses, meadows and brooks where the days were endless.   David graduated from Dalhousie in Commerce and has also had a varied career in a wide variety of for profit, government, non-profit and consulting roles. When not drawn to some trail, he also likes choral singing, currently with Kanata and Arnprior Community Choirs.

    This is a two-hour walk geared to beginners or those who may have difficulty on rigorous trails.  Roger and David will identify common trees.  Leaves (mostly on the ground), bark, structure and what the tree is "doing" will be identifiers.  For more advanced naturalists, please note there will be another outing for you with Erik Pohanka to learn how to ID leafless trees later in November or early December.

    Anticipate mud and wear suitable footwear. Please bring water to drink, and dress for the weather (warmly as it is getting cold these days) with long pants tucked into your socks (poison ivy and ticks).  Binoculars are useful but not essential, a hand lens (small personal magnifying glass) and a camera are always a good idea if you have them.  Please also note that many locations we visit are in areas where picking flora of any kind is either not advisable or outright banned.  Please do not pick anything while on group outings as it could reflect poorly on the club as a whole.

    A note about Covid:  Participant numbers will be restricted to those allowed by local Health bylaws so register early and only if you truly know you can come.  You may register yourself and anyone in your own household only.  Participation will be on a first come first registered basis.   Confirmation emails will be sent.

    We will be maintaining physical distancing requirements.  Please bring a non-medical mask as this will be mandatory for all participants. Please do not come if you are ill or have come in contact with someone who has tested positive for Covid 19.  Notification of cancellation as soon as possible would be appreciated.  Also please ensure that you notify us (via mfncfieldtrips@gmail.com ) if you later find that you have come into contact with Covid 19.  The Covid app can also be downloaded via: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19/covid-alert.html

    Register for this outing at events@mfnc.ca (please include your full name) no later than Wednesday November 4th.

    If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

  • Tue
    01
    Dec
    2020
    7:00 pmZoom Meeting - Details to follow

    Our Presenter:

    Jean-Pierre (J-P) Thonney is a retired aquatic biologist with over 30 years’ experience in 16 countries.  His main areas of study include fisheries management, environmental assessment/mitigation, and aquatic ecosystem capacity evaluation. He obtained his BSc Honours in Aquatic Ecology at Memorial University in Newfoundland and MSc in Sustainable Fisheries at Stirling University, Scotland

    The Presentation:

    White Lake has experienced a range of anthropogenic based changes to its aquatic community structure since its initial creation through impoundment in the mid-1800s. In order to gain a better understanding of these implications of these effects we will be taking an underwater tour to observe changes to the lake’s aquatic flora and fauna over time. This visual exploration will focus on recent impacts from shoreline development, invasive species introductions, and other changes associated with an ever increasing human footprint around the lake.

    Biography:

    Jean-Pierre (J-P) Thonney is a retired aquatic biologist with over 30 years’ experience in 16 countries working on behalf of international government agencies and NGOs in the field of freshwater and marine biodiversity. His main areas of study include fisheries management, environmental assessment/mitigation, and aquatic ecosystem capacity evaluation. He obtained his BSc Honours in Aquatic Ecology at Memorial University in Newfoundland and MSc in Sustainable Fisheries at Stirling University, Scotland

  • Tue
    02
    Mar
    2021
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Donna Naughton, CMN (ret'd) will present an overview of Canadian mammals - details to follow.

    Please see: The Natural History of Canadian Mammals – Illustrated, Oct. 9 2012, by Donna Naughton

  • Tue
    06
    Apr
    2021
    7:30 pmZoom Meeting (TBD)

    Our Presenter:

    Michael Allan is a Wildlife Research Technician with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and has worked as a wildlife research technician/biologist for over 30 years. He has two college diplomas: an Environmental Resource Field Technician diploma from Loyalist College in Belleville and a Fish and Wildlife Technician diploma from Fleming College in Lindsay. He also completed an Honours BSc degree in biology/environmental science and an MSc in Environmental and Life Sciences from Trent University.

    The Presentation:

    Mike will present on the history of elk in North America - species and range and on the restoration of elk in Ontario. He will provide an update on the Bancroft-North Hastings (BNH) elk herd and present some of the research findings on the herd. Mike will discuss past, current and future survey methods employed and will provide the current status of elk in release areas.

    Biography:

    Michael Allan is a Wildlife Research Technician with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. He has worked as a wildlife research technician/biologist for over 30 years.  He completed his Master of Science on elk calving site selection and fidelity on the Bancroft North Hastings elk herd and has been involved with research on this herd since 2000.  He has also been working on canine research and management and assisted in organizing a cooperative international plan to relocate wolves successfully from Michipicoten Island, Ontario to Isle Royale in Michigan, USA.  He has conducted wildlife research on many species of animals including big game - elk, moose, deer, caribou, black bears, polar bears and wolves - and has considerable expertise in methods associated in controlling rabies in raccoon populations. Mike is currently working on developing a suitable method for aerial inventory survey of elk in the Bancroft North Hastings herd.

    He possesses two college diplomas, an Environmental Resource Field Technician diploma from Loyalist College in Belleville and a Fish and Wildlife Technician diploma from Fleming College in Lindsay.  He completed his Honour’s undergrad degree in biology/environmental science and his Master of Science degree in Environmental and Life Sciences from Trent University.