Past Events & Meetings

What have MFNC members done in the past? Find out here in our archive of past field trips and meetings through to the beginning of 2014!

  • Sun
    12
    Nov
    2017
    12:30 pmArnprior

    Meet:  at the Macnamara trail, directions are on this website.

    We need your help to tidy up the trail. The work will probably go on for a few hours but any amount of time that you could help would be most welcome. Bring clippers or loppers or garden shears to trim the plants which are encroaching on the trail. Register at events@mfnc.ca and I will update the information if necessary.

  • Tue
    07
    Nov
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Lynn Gillespie is a Research Scientist in Botany at the Canadian Museum of Nature and an Adjunct Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa.  Her research focuses on the systematics and evolution of flowering plants, especially grasses, spurges and Arctic plants.  Lynn completed her BSc at Carleton University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis.

    The Presentation:

    Flowering plants have evolved to become the most diverse and abundant group of plants.   Dr. Gillespie will give an overview of the diversity and evolution of flowering plants and explore why they have become so successful.  She will also discuss how new ways of studying plants are changing our understanding of their evolution and hence their classification. Examples will include some from our local flora and others from her lab’s research on grasses and spurges.

    Biography:

    Lynn Gillespie is a Research Scientist in Botany at the Canadian Museum of Nature and an Adjunct Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa.  Her research focuses on the systematics and evolution of flowering plants, especially grasses, spurges and Arctic plants.  Lynn completed her BSc at Carleton University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. She has conducted fieldwork around the world, including South America, southeast Asia, Madagascar, Australia, and the Canadian Arctic.

  • Wed
    01
    Nov
    2017
    2:30 pmArnprior

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet:  in the parking lot of the Metro Store, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior. Park close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    We will look for raptors, geese and ducks at the head pond of the Madawaska River and  then explore various other areas around Arnprior in search of local and migrant birds. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sun
    15
    Oct
    2017
    9:30 amDunrobin/Carp

    Leader:  Dave Forsyth with Beth and John McEwen

    Meet:  1308 Vance's Side Rd. (corner of Woodkilton) to organize and carpool to our first stop

    This will be a half-day geotraverse of the Carp Ridge.  We will travel by car and make 7 stops at points of significant geological interest along the ridge.  Wear comfortable shoes, although the walking should not be difficult.  Registrants will receive a PDF package with more information about the  geology of the areas we will be visiting.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    07
    Oct
    2017
    10:30 amArnprior

    Leader:  Suzanne Monnon

    Meet:  at the Macnamara Trail, directions on this website

    Have you ever wanted to learn the basics about mushrooms? If your answer is "yes" then this outing is for you. We will go into the forest to search for and identify many different types of fungi.

    Our leader has been an avid amateur mycologist for many years. She will share her knowledge in a way that beginners will understand, so no previous knowledge is necessary.

    Wear weather-appropriate clothing. Bring a small knife, loupe lens if you have one, water and a snack. Expect to be on the trail for 2-3h.  This outing is especially " kid-friendly" and very appropriate for the Young Macs.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    03
    Oct
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Steven Cooke is a Professor of Biology and Environmental Science and the Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology at Carleton University. His specialty is ecology and conservation physiology of fish, and he is best known for researching physiological responses in fish in regard to natural and human impacts. Dr. Cooke attained a Bachelor of Environmental Studies and a Master's in Biology at the University of Waterloo, and a PhD in Biology at the University of Illinois.

    The Presentation:

    Fish live in dynamic environments and respond accordingly by moving at various spatial and temporal scales.  For centuries these movements have been the basis of folk lore but only in the last few decades have we had the tools necessary to study fish across ocean basins, between the Laurentian Great Lakes, and up/down thousand kilometer river systems.  In this presentation, Dr. Cooke will describe the biotelemetry toolbox which has provided a window on the elusive and cryptic underwater world.

    Biography:

    Steven Cooke is a Professor of Biology and Environmental Science and the Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology at Carleton University.  He attained a Bachelor of Environmental Studies and a Master's in Biology at the University of Waterloo, and a PhD in Biology at the University of Illinois.

    Dr. Cooke studies the ecology, behaviour, and physiology of wild fish in an effort to understand fundamental biological phenomena and to inform conservation and resource management.  Research in the Cooke Lab spans marine and freshwater systems and occurs locally (e.g., the Ottawa River, Kenauk Nature Reserve, the Rideau Canal), across Canada (from the Fraser River in BC to the marine waters of PEI), and the globe (e.g., active research projects in Norway, Denmark, India, Australia, The Bahamas, and more).  See www.fecpl.ca for more details on the Cooke Lab.

  • Sat
    09
    Sep
    2017
    9 am - 4 pmOttawa

    Leader: Sophie Cardinal
    Location: Salons A and B of the K.W. Neatby Building, Central Experimental
    Farm, 960 Carling Avenue

    Description: Bug Day is coordinated by the Entomological Society of Ontario in
    partnership with OFNC and AAFC. Visitors are invited to learn all about the
    fascinating world of insects, from expert entomologists on hand. Activities will
    include: a live insect zoo, guided insect nature walks, seminars on insects,
    cockroach races, kid’s insect crafts, ask a bug expert, building insect
    collections, cooking with insects and more. This event will happen rain or shine
    in conjunction with the Central Experimental Farm Research Open House.

  • Tue
    05
    Sep
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Troy McMullinDr. Troy McMullin is a research scientist specializing in lichenology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. He focuses on the application of lichen taxonomy and systematics to a broad range of research areas. Troy received bachelor degrees in biology at Trent University, has a Bachelor of Education degree in biology and outdoor education from Queen’s University, and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Guelph. Troy has published extensively in academic journals and public media.

    The Presentation:

    Join Troy to explore the often overlooked, but beautiful and fascinating world of lichens. Learn about their roles in different ecosystems and how they are used in medicine, science, and space.  He will also cover rare lichens occurring in south-eastern Ontario, including the only species in the region that is federally (COSEWIC – Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) listed as endangered, Pale-Bellied Frost Lichen (Physconia subpallida), which is known from the Arnprior area. You will gain a new appreciation for the small things in life!

    Biography:

    Dr. Troy McMullin is a research scientist specializing in lichenology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. He focuses on the application of lichen taxonomy and systematics to a broad range of research areas, including: biomonitoring, conservation, DNA barcoding, ethnobotany, restoration, sustainable forest management, woodland caribou habitat management, and more.

    Troy received bachelor degrees in biology at Trent University, has a Bachelor of Education degree in biology and outdoor education from Queen’s University, and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Guelph.

    Troy has published extensively in academic journals and public media. His latest co-authored book was recently released by the New York Botanical Garden Press, Common Lichens of Northeastern North America: A Field Guide.

  • Sun
    27
    Aug
    2017
    1:00 pmCarp Road

    Leader:  Lis Allison

    Meet:  6114 Carp Rd., between Galetta Side Rd. and Kinburn Side Rd.

    The area around Ottawa is particularly rich in native fern species. We have over 40 different species here.  Ferns have a public relations problem; they all tend to look alike to those who haven't studied them, but, when you examine them more closely, you begin to appreciate the wonderful diversity and complexity of ferns.

    On August 27, you are invited to an Afternoon of Ferns at Lis Allison's home on the Carp Road. Lis will talk about the classification and identification of ferns, with particular attention to our local ferns. She will explain   where to look for them in the wild and how to grow them. After that she will take you around her extensive garden, where you will see many of the Ottawa Valley ferns.  Often they are used in garden situations and, early fall being an excellent time to plant ferns, some small ferns will be available for sale. Register at events@mfnc.ca

     

  • Sat
    05
    Aug
    2017
    10am - 1pmMorris Island

    Leader: Christian Renault

    Note: the location is changed due to updated information as to the numbers of odonates in various areas.

    Meet: Morris Island Conservation Area, 156 Morris Island Drive, (off the Galetta Side Rd.)

    We will explore areas along the Ottawa River and other habitats which should provide excellent opportunities to find many different species of dragonflies and damselflies at this time of year. Sturdy footwear is recommended but most locations are relatively flat and easy to walk. Bring a lunch, water and good protection for the sun and biting insects. Other items which will be useful: a bug net, field guide, binoculars. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    15
    Jul
    2017
    11 am - 2 pmMississippi Mills

    Please note this event is cancelled and may be rescheduled at a later date.

    Leader: Shelby Gibson

    Meet: at the Mill of Kintail Conservation Area, in the parking lot, 1 Almonte Street, Mississippi Mills.

    Note, there is a $6 fee for each car.

    There are over 730 species of bees found in Canada. Shelby will introduce us to some of our native bees with a short talk and she will provide specimens for us to observe. We will follow that with time in the field to search for bumblebees and count them. The habitat has open field areas as well as trails, so we should have a good mix of things to look at.  Counts will be added to a Citizen Science project, “The Great Canadian Bumblebee Count", which runs July/August. Wear sturdy shoes and dress for the sun and biting insects. Bring water and a snack, also binoculars, camera and butterfly/bug net if you have them. This outing is very “kid-friendly”! Register at events@mfnc.ca

     

     

     

  • Sat
    08
    Jul
    2017
    8:30 am - 4:30 pmAlmonte

    Leaders: Jeff Skevington and Peter Hall

    Meet:  in the parking lot at the intersection of Dwyer Hill Road and March Road (NE of Almonte).
    Call Jeff Skevington Friday evening at 613-720-2862 if in doubt about the weather or for specific questions regarding this event. The rain date will be July 9.  Similar to Christmas Bird Counts, this event is an all-day survey of in a 24 km diameter circle. The count area is centred on Manion Corners (SW of Ottawa) and includes several important butterfly areas such as the Long Swamp and the Burnt Lands alvar. No experience is necessary - we will put teams together on site and match up people so that everyone has a chance to learn from the experts. If you have binoculars and a butterfly net, please bring them along. Butterflies may be captured for identification and release. Rubber boots are recommended, as some of the sites have a lot of poison ivy.  It is an all-day event so bring your lunch.
    We plan to meet at 6:00 pm after the count for a compilation and potluck dinner at the Allisons’ home at 561 Wolf Grove Road, about 2.6 km west of Almonte. Please bring along some food to share plus your own drinks. We hope that everyone can make it to the compilation, as it will be a lot of fun; however, if you can’t, we will get your data in the afternoon before you leave. OFNC has generously offered to pay the count fees for participants to support publication of the data. Registration is not required for this event. This event is especially "kid friendly".

  • Wed
    28
    Jun
    2017
    8:30 amWhite Lake

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: 8:30 am in the parking lot of the Metro Store, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior. Park close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    This is a unique wetland which holds multiple species of our native orchids, carnivorous plants and unusual insects too, like the Bogbean Buckmoth. Wet feet are guaranteed in the fen so old running shoes make perfect footwear on a hot day. Hip-waders or tall rubber boots would work too. It is a good idea to cover up with light clothing for protection against the sun and the biting insects. Bring a hand lens and binoculars if you have them. Expect to be out until early afternoon and bring lots of water and a lunch. There will be an ice cream stop along the way to our picnic area. Note: There will be a limited number of registrations accepted for this trip due to the sensitive nature of the fen habitat. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    27
    Jun
    2017
    2:30 pm-4:30 pmArnprior

    Leader:  Michael Runtz

    Meet:  At the trailhead on McNab St. Directions are on our website.

    Michael, who was one of the original founders of the trail and who knows the natural history of the trail intimately, will lead us on a discovery walk through the area where we will be building the extension.  This is a wonderful opportunity to see the trail if you have never walked it before and a great chance to see the extension plans if you are a regular on the trail. Wear comfortable shoes (Rubber boots would be best for those wanting to explore the wetter areas.) and be prepared for biting insects.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Mon
    12
    Jun
    2017
    6:15 pmWest Carleton Secondary School, 3088 Dunrobin Road

    Due to the weather forecast, this event is moved to June 12.

    Leader: Art Goldsmith

    Meet: at the front door of West Carleton Secondary School. We will walk back to the Bill Mason Centre from there.

    Target species in the wetland will be Wilson’s Snipe, American Bittern, Virginia Rail and Sora. In the forest and fields we should see a variety of songbirds and woodpeckers. There will be mosquitoes so cover up and bring repellent. Register at events@mfnc.ca

     

  • Tue
    06
    Jun
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Patty McLaughlin has been involved with the Wild Bird Care Centre since she was 16. After completing 2 university degrees in biology, she now works at the centre looking after wounded birds brought in by the public, and running their educational program.

    The Presentation:

    The Ottawa Valley Wild Bird Care Centre is the only place in the Ottawa Valley Area dedicated to the care, treatment, and release of sick, injured, and orphaned wild birds. It is a registered charitable organization and through public donations is able to care for over 3000 wild birds annually. The Centre welcomes visitors to come and learn about its history and daily operations, and hear stories about the most common and the most unusual patients! The presentation will provide a firsthand experience of what it is like to care for over 120 different species of wild birds each year though pictures, video and facts. Ms. McLaughlin will share tricks used to keep the birds comfortable in captivity based on their typical personalities, interesting facts, and miraculous recoveries. She will be accompanied by her sidekick, Indigo, an American kestrel, who cannot be released back into the wild because of his injuries.

    Biography:

    Patty McLaughlin first became involved with the Wild Bird Care Centre at the age of 16 as a volunteer.  She continued to work as a summer student for 5 years as she completed her B.Sc. in Zoology at Laurentian University. She finished her M.Sc. at Carleton University before returning to the Bird Centre where she has been caring for the birds as well as developing and running their educational program for the last 6 years. In 2013, Patty received The Elizabeth Le Geyt Award in recognition of her outstanding contribution to public awareness and care for wild birds. Patty’s passion to educate others about birds and the natural world lead her to create a Young Naturalist program for the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists. Now in its 5th year, this successful program continues to fill to its maximum capacity with nature loving 5 – 11 year olds.

  • Sat
    20
    May
    2017
    7a.m.-1p.m.Riddell Dr.

    This will be a great outing as Celia Bodnar will show us the full workings of a bird banding operation. We will have the opportunity to learn about the important research and monitoring activities occurring at Innis Point and to observe bird banding when migration is near its peak. This will include taking birds out of mist nets (if the weather cooperates), and learning how to band the birds as well as record all of the data for each bird. The Innis Point Bird Observatory was founded in 1982 and is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of birds and natural history. The site is on the Ottawa River and is wet and rocky in places. Dress for the weather and wear boots. Bring drinks and snacks.

    How to get there: From the lights in Dunrobin Village, turn northeast at the lights onto Thomas A. Dolan Pkwy and then take the second right to turn onto 6th Line. Drive down 6th Line about 7 km to where it swings sharp left and becomes Riddell Dr. Don’t turn, just drive straight onto the driveway that ends in a locked Department of Defence gate. Pull in here and wait at the gate. Someone will meet us at the gate at 7:00 am so please arrive a few minutes before that to be sure not to be locked out. If you are late, we cannot come back to let you in. (If you are coming from Ottawa, turn onto the Dunrobin Rd. from March Rd. and Riddell Dr. will be the first right turn.) For more information contact Angela Skevington 613-832-1970  This event is weather-sensitive.  Please check the website the night before; any changes would be posted there.

  • Sun
    14
    May
    2017
    12:00p.m.-3:00p.m.Arnprior

    Leader:  Owen Clarkin

    Meet:  at the Trailhead on McNab St.

    As a follow-up to Owen's presentation at our May 2 club meeting, we will explore the Macnamara trail from a botanical perspective.   His special interest is native trees of Eastern Ontario so we will focus on these but there will also be many other plants and animals to observe as we wander around this diverse area.  Wildflowers should be abundant and there will certainly be birds.  Don't forget your binoculars.  Sturdy footwear is recommended.  Register at  events@mfnc.ca

     

  • Sat
    13
    May
    2017
    all dayBrighton, ON

    Leader:  Doug Mcrae

    This will be an all-day outing in the park where we will watch for spring migrants. There should be a good variety of warblers by this time of year, along with ducks and many other species of interest. We will begin early in the morning so it is advisable to stay in the area overnight Friday. There are accommodations nearby and camping is available in the park. The group will be limited to 25 members so please register early at events@mfnc.ca and questions may be sent to this same address.  More information will be provided to registrants.

  • Tue
    02
    May
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Gilles Grove, Arnprior

    Gillies Grove

    Our Presenter:

    Owen Clarkin grew up near Russell Ontario, and has been studying the trees of Eastern Ontario as a dedicated amateur from an early age. He has a formal background in the natural sciences and is Chair of the Conservation Committee of the Ottawa Field Naturalists’ Club.

    The Presentation:

    We live in a rapidly-changing natural environment.  Among life-forms, trees often give an impression of dynamic stability due to their potential for relatively long lives, and static appearance once mature.  However, observations on the ground indicate that the treed landscape of eastern Ontario and wider North America is changing rapidly. This is due to many factors including higher mortality of and indifference to indigenous species, changes in habitat, and the unprecedented large-scale introduction of alien trees and pests.  Mr. Clarkin will discuss the history of trees in our region, present-day observations, and trends to consider as we look to the future.

    Biography:

    Owen Clarkin grew up near Russell Ontario, and has been studying the trees of Eastern Ontario as a dedicated amateur since the age of 4. After finishing a conventional education in the natural sciences, he has been more seriously exploring topics in tree ecology from an Eastern Ontario perspective, together with a core group of colleagues. He is Chair of the Conservation Committee of the Ottawa Field Naturalists’ Club.

  • Sat
    08
    Apr
    2017
    6:30 pmMunster area (meet at Park&Ride, details below)
    One of the great sights of early spring is the mating display of the American Woodcock. These shorebirds are common but require a special effort to see well.
    We will be driving 45 minutes to the Munster area to look for these birds as we know this area well. Meet at  6:30pm at the Park and Ride on County Road 29 just north of highway 417.
    Bring binoculars and a flashlight and have kids wear snowpants or rain pants as we will be laying on the ground at times. It will be a bit of a late night for kids as these birds are only active at dusk and after dark but it should be a lot of fun and well worth the loss of a few winks. If we are lucky we may also hear or even see an owl as the area is great for a variety of wildlife.
    Adults without kids also welcome!
     
    If you have any questions, please email angela_skevington@yahoo.ca or call at (613) 832-1970.
  • Tue
    04
    Apr
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Jessica Forrest is an Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of plant-pollinator interactions and the population biology of wild bees.

    The Presentation:

    Of the approximately 4000 species of bees native to North America, none produces marketable honey—but all have fascinating, and usually solitary, private lives. In this presentation, Dr. Forrest will give an overview of the natural history of bees, with a focus on the Canadian fauna. She will also summarize some of her lab’s recent findings on the factors affecting wild bee populations—including flowers, parasites, and temperatures—and discuss ways to support local pollinator communities.

    Biography:

    Jessica Forrest is an Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa, where she teaches upper-level ecology courses, including an alpine ecology field course and courses on plant-animal interactions. Her research focuses on the ecology and evolution of plant-pollinator interactions and the population biology of wild bees. Jessica completed her PhD in 2011 at the University of Toronto and has conducted field work in Colorado, California, and Ontario. To learn more about her lab’s research, visit https://forrestlab.wordpress.com/.

  • Sun
    02
    Apr
    2017
    7:00 pmArnprior/Pakenham area

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: in the Metro store parking lot, 375 Daniel St., Arnprior. Park opposite the store but close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    Michael will lead us to several locations where we can expect to find owls. Target species are: Barred Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl and Eastern Screech-Owl. Along the way we will learn about the ecology and behaviour of these beautiful and fascinating birds. Dress very warmly; we will be standing outside for periods of time. This trip is now full.

  • Tue
    07
    Mar
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    A highlight annual event.  Combine learning, laughter and camaraderie. NO experience is necessary! Puns welcome.  If you are good at riddles, then this is the place to be! But, be prepared to meet your match. Michael's riddles are challenging, evocative and ever so finely crafted.

    Come and find out. This is an awesome and exhilarating way to learn about local natural history. Michael’s contagious enthusiasm, his keen insight into the intricacies of nature, and the countless anecdotes of his experiences as a naturalist always make for a very entertaining evening.

    Participants will be divided into teams that will compete to answer riddles and identify items from nature. Is there a young, dynamic, capable team ready to conquer all? Or perhaps, 2 out of 3?

  • Fri
    10
    Feb
    2017
    7:30 pmOxford Mills

    with Fred Scheuler and Aleta Karstad

    Due to high water levels and low numbers of mudpuppies coming to the dam this week, we have postponed the event to February 10 when we are much more likely to have good numbers of them.
    A study of the Oxford Mills mudpuppies was begun in 1998 and continues every Friday night over the winter. We are invited to go and participate in this kid-friendly activity. The location has unusually large numbers of mudpuppies and we hope to see lots of them in the shallow water as they come upstream to feed. Wear warm, high, water-proof footwear as we will be standing in the water for about 1h. Bring a flashlight if you have one. The Brigadoon pub is nearby for a snack and a hot drink after, or participants may wish to have dinner there before the event. Register at events@mfnc.ca. Registrants will receive more details later.

     

  • Tue
    07
    Feb
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    A highlight annual event.  Combine learning, laughter and camaraderie. NO experience is necessary! Puns welcome.  If you are good at riddles, then this is the place to be! But, be prepared to meet your match. Michael's riddles are challenging, evocative and ever so finely crafted.

    Come and find out. This is an awesome and exhilarating way to learn about local natural history. Michael’s contagious enthusiasm, his keen insight into the intricacies of nature, and the countless anecdotes of his experiences as a naturalist always make for a very entertaining evening.

    Participants will be divided into teams that will compete to answer riddles and identify items from nature. Is there a young, dynamic, capable team ready to conquer all? Or perhaps, 2 out of 3?

  • Sat
    14
    Jan
    2017
    11am-2pmMarch Road

    Leader: Jakob Mueller

    Meet:  at the trailhead, which is on the March Road at Huntmar. There is a small lot which will accommodate some cars and parking on the road is the other option.

    Come and discover this new trail on the Carp Ridge in Carp and enjoy a general nature walk. Bring your binoculars, snowshoes, water and a snack. Register at events@mfnc.ca

    Note: On Friday afternoon, January 13, the trails are hard packed but not icy.  Either snowshoes or sturdy boots would be fine.

  • Tue
    03
    Jan
    2017
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    We are looking forward to learning all about your prized nature or natural history possessions or experiences! Please sign in at the door with the item or topic you wish to showcase. If you are showing photos, there should not be more than five and they should be on a USB key. You may also bring prints to put on a table. Donations welcome from non-presenters (a Loonie or Toonie, please). See you there!

  • Wed
    28
    Dec
    2016
    1:00 pmMacnamara Trail

    Meet at the Macnamara Trailhead on McNab Street at 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. (weather permitting) for a walk to count the birds. We'll be learning about some of our feathery winter residents and recording how many we see and hear to report to the group.

    Interested adults also welcome!

    Please register ahead by email with Telsing Andrews at  telsing_andrews@hotmail.com.

     

  • Mon
    26
    Dec
    2016

    103rd Annual Pakenham-Arnprior Christmas Bird Count

    December 26:  103rd Annual Pakenham-Arnprior Christmas Bird Count. We are looking for participants with at least minimal experience in identifying birds. Participants are assigned an area to cover and are paired so no one goes alone. It is a full day event with a pot-luck dinner/compilation afterwards. If you wish to take part, please contact Michael Runtz at mruntz@start.ca or at 613-387-2503.

  • Tue
    06
    Dec
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Bill Montevecchi is a University Research Professor in the Psychology, Biology and Ocean Sciences Departments at Memorial University of Newfoundland.  His interdisciplinary research lab focuses on the behavioral ecology of birds and their responses to environmental change.

    The Presentation:

    Funk Island, a small granite outcrop 50 km off the northeast Newfoundland coast, is home to a large colony of Northern Gannets and the world’s largest colony of Common Murres. The island’s remoteness and treacherous access for humans and other terrestrial predators, has allowed these cliff-nesting seabirds to lay their eggs at ground zero.

    Just over a couple of centuries ago, Funk Island held the largest breeding aggregation of the last flightless bird of the northern hemisphere – the Great Auk or “Penguin” as it was called then. The grassy meadow on the otherwise bald rock has grown upon the composed remains of the many thousands of auks that were discarded by crews that plucked their down for stuffing in mattresses and quilts.

    Yet during historical times and well before, another people – the Beothuk also visited Funk Island for different purposes.  This talk will explore the co-occurrences of the extinct flightless bird and the extinct indigenous people who have captured my imagination since I first set foot on Funk Island 40 years ago and have been returning every year since.

    Biography:

    Bill Montevecchi is a University Research Professor in the Psychology, Biology and Ocean Sciences Departments at Memorial University of Newfoundland.  His interdisciplinary research lab focuses on the behavioral ecology of birds and their responses to environmental change.  He has more than 350 publications, including Newfoundland Birds: Exploitation, Study, Conservation (1987, Harvard University) written with the late Les Tuck.  His permanent community exhibition Funk Island Seabirds and the Extinct Great Auk on Fogo Island provides a basis for conservation, educational and artistic activity.

    In May 2016, the Canadian Partners in Research bestowed him with their Natural Science Ambassador Award.  In 2011, Nature NL presented him with the Tuck – Walters Award, and in 2008 Ocean Net acknowledged his efforts with a Local Hero Award.  He is a Science Advisor for Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council [NSERC], the US National Science Foundation, Bird Studies Canada, Nelson Canada, the Wilderness and Ecological Reserves and the Species Status Committees of Newfoundland and Labrador, and is Chair of the Sandy Pond Alliance to Protect Canadian Waters.  He has served as a Director of Nature Canada and the Nature Conservancy [Atlantic]. beothukgreat-auk

  • Sun
    27
    Nov
    2016
    12:00 pmArnprior/Pakenham area

    Leader: Jon Ruddy

    Meet: at the Metro parking lot, Daniel St., Arnprior. Park opposite the store but close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    We will travel by car from downtown Arnprior to nearby areas where we might expect to see birds of prey. Red-tailed Hawks, Rough-legged Hawks, Snowy Owls, Short-eared Owls, Northern Shrikes, Bald Eagles and American Kestrels are all possibilities. We may even find a Golden Eagle. Of course, we will watch for any interesting birds along our route. Dress really warmly as we will be standing outside for periods of time. Some of us plan to stop at PJ's in Arnprior for dinner after the outing. Please indicate when you register if you wish to stay for dinner.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    01
    Nov
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Allan Donaldson is a retired professor from the Department of Geology, Carleton University in Ottawa. His specialty is sedimentology, with an emphasis on rock strata of Precambrian age.

    The Presentation: 

    Stromatolites are distinctive layered structures formed by biofilms of cyanobacteria. They provide an impressive record of the only life that existed throughout the first 90% of our planet's 4.6 billion-year-old history. When more complex life forms evolved at the end of the Precambrian, predation on cyanobacterial precursors was a predictable consequence, resulting in a paucity of stromatolites thereafter. In much of the Ottawa Valley, however, stromatolites are remarkably abundant in Ordovician strata, and some occur in the underlying Cambrian strata. An environmental condition unsuitable for biofilm browsers such as gastropods is the likely reason. Absence of gastropod fossils within the stromatolite-bearing strata, along with associated evidence of evaporitic conditions, suggest that hypersalinity is the likely explanation for abundant stromatolites throughout the Ottawa Valley. Hamelin Pool in Shark Bay, Australia, provides a present-day example of such an environment.

    Biography:

    Allan Donaldson (BSc Queen's 1956, PhD Johns Hopkins 1960) spent a decade working for the Geological Survey of Canada, followed by 35 years as a professor at Carleton University. His teaching and research specialty is sedimentology, with an emphasis on studies of strata of Precambrian age. In retirement Allan continues to contribute to geological outreach projects in Eastern Ontario.

  • Sun
    23
    Oct
    2016
    9:00 amArnprior

    Meet:  at the Macnamara trail kiosk

    Please come and help with this important activity if you can spare a few hours or even less.  We usually work until noon but any time you can offer would be appreciated. Wear comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes.  Bring work gloves, pruners and loppers, if your have them.  Contact Steve Duffield at s.duffield@xplornet.com for more information and to confirm your participation.

  • Sat
    15
    Oct
    2016
    10:00 amAntrim/Pakenham area

    Leader:  Dave Forsyth

    Meet:  at 10:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Anglican Church, Antrim, at the corner of the Kinburn Side Rd. and old highway 17

    We will car pool from there and travel to 3 or 4 local sites to examine fossils from the Ordovician Period, about 450 million years ago. These fossils range from corals to cephalopods. For those who wish to continue on, we will stop for lunch in Pakenham and explore two more sites in the afternoon. Wear sturdy shoes and comfortable clothing.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

    Kid-friendly!

  • Tue
    04
    Oct
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Jim des Rivières is a photographer and fine art printer who created a website (moths.ca) to share images of moths collected in and around the Ottawa Valley.
    The Presentation:
    For several years he has been photographing local moths and butterflies, but mainly moths. Working with dried specimens, he captures high resolution digital images directly with a desktop flatbed scanner, from which he makes large prints using an inkjet printer. The large prints allow the viewer to see the creature close up without need of a magnifying glass. This reveals a marvellous world of intricate shapes, structures, and colours that surprise and delight viewers of all ages. In this presentation he will run through the stages involved in producing these works of art on paper, and showcase some of his favourite local moths.
    Biography:
    Jim des Rivières is a photographer and fine art printer. He is best known for his exhibit of 45 large format moth images ( http://moths.ca/exhibit/ ) which were first shown at Ottawa’s Canadian Museum of Nature in 2010 and are currently touring nature museums in cities across Canada and the U.S., including New York City, Edmonton, and Saint John.

  • Sun
    02
    Oct
    2016
    1:00 pmArnprior

    Leader:  Suzanne Monnon

    Meet:  at the Macnamara Trail, directions on this website

    Have you ever wanted to learn the basics about mushrooms? If your answer is "yes" then this outing is for you. We will go into the forest to search for and identify many different types of fungi.

    Our leader has been an avid amateur mycologist for many years. She will share her knowledge in a way that beginners will understand, so no previous knowledge is necessary.

    Wear weather-appropriate clothing. Bring a small knife, loupe lens if you have one, water and a snack.Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    24
    Sep
    2016
    10 a.m. to noon3348 Hunt Line Road, Kinburn

    Snakes and Bees

    Sleepy bumblebees and sunning garter snakes, come and learn about what these (and more) backyard residents are doing as the growing year winds down and how they overwinter. An interactive walk for young field naturalists.

    Register at youngmacs@mfnc.ca

  • Sun
    11
    Sep
    2016
    1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.Metcalfe Geoheritage Park (MGP) in Almonte

    Leader: Allan Donaldson, Ottawa-Gatineau Geoheritage Project

    Meet: At 1:30 p.m. in the parking lot adjacent to Metcalfe Geoheritage Park (MGP) in Almonte .

    The outdoor display of 22 rock specimens in Metcalfe Geoheritage Park offers an introduction to the principal rock types that underlie Eastern Ontario. Originally established more than a decade ago, the display has been recently upgraded by moving it to an open area and adding a walkway loop, with an explanatory entrance way panel. Additional specimens will be on hand to show features typical of the Canadian Shield, the overlying local Paleozoic strata and the unconsolidated glacially deposited overburden.

    The tour of MGP in Almonte will be finished by 3 p.m., but for those interested, additional stops will be made on the return trip to view bedrock exposures in Almonte and Pakenham.

    This trip depends on the weather. Please visit the Macnamara Field Naturalists’ Club website (mfnc.ca) for notice of cancellation. This field trip will be limited to the first 20 members who register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    06
    Sep
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Dr.  Grégory Bulté is a biology instructor at Carleton University where he teaches lecture-based and field courses about animal biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology.

    The Presentation:

    The reproductive behaviours of aquatic turtles are poorly understood due to the difficulties of studying these animals under natural conditions. Since 2003, I have been studying the ecology and behaviour of the northern map turtle in Lake Opinicon. Using a wide range of field techniques, my collaborators and I have uncovered many aspects of the reproductive biology of this fascinating creature. I will share with you the most exciting highlights of this on-going work as well as some tantalizing unanswered questions.

    Biography:

    Grégory Bulté is a biology instructor at Carleton University where he teaches lecture-based and field courses in the areas of animal biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology. He is particularly interested in the behaviour, conservation, and natural history of amphibians and reptiles and has been spearheading a long-term ecological study on the northern map turtle in Lake Opinicon.

    Grégory first completed a college degree in biological techniques which ignited his interest for wildlife research. He then completed an undergraduate degree in biology at l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières followed by a PhD in biology at the University of Ottawa, and a post-doctoral fellowship at Carleton University.

     

    Photo by Michael Runtz

    Basking allows northern map turtles to elevate their body temperature and absorb energy. Photo by Michael Runtz

  • Sat
    13
    Aug
    2016
    8:30 p.m. - midnightArnprior

    Due to a forecast of unfavourable weather this outing is cancelled, hopefully to be rescheduled for next summer.

    Leader: Diane Lepage

    Meet:  At 8:30 p.m. at the trailhead on McNab St., Arnprior. Directions available on this website.

    Come to the trail to discover and identify many of our local moths and find out what they are doing in the nighttime. Black lights will be set up and then we will wait in the dark as various moths are attracted to the white sheet that has been put up on the trail. Bring a flashlight, bug repellent, study footwear and a field guide if you have one.
    This trip depends on the weather. In the case of rain or temperatures below 16 degrees C, the outing will be cancelled. It will be limited to the first 20 members who register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    16
    Jul
    2016
    10 a.m. to noonConstance Bay

     

    This field trip has been cancelled.

  • Sun
    03
    Jul
    2016
    12:30 pmArnprior

    Leader: Lis Allison

    Meet: At 12:30pm at the trailhead on McNab St., Arnprior

    Would you like to know more about the ferns along the Macnamara Trail? There are approximately 40 species of ferns native to the Ottawa Valley and the Trail has almost half of them, including the best patch of Walking Fern in the Valley.  Join Lis Allison for a brief (15 minute) talk about ferns, followed by a guided walk to see some of them. This trip will run rain or shine, unless severe weather is forecast. Please register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sun
    03
    Jul
    2016
    8:30 amDwyer Hill Rd.

    Members of MFNC are invited to join in this event.

    Saturday, 2 July, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
    (rain date Sunday 3 July)
    *Especially kid friendly*

    Leaders: Jeff Skevington and Peter Hall
    Meet: in the parking lot at the intersection of Dwyer Hill Road and March Road (NE of Almonte).

    Similar to Christmas Bird Counts, this event is an all-day survey of in a 24 km diameter circle. There is a $4 charge to participants to support the publication of the results. The count area is centred on Manion Corners (SW of Ottawa) and includes several important butterfly areas such as the Long Swamp and the Burnt Lands alvar. No experience is necessary - we will put teams together on site and match up people so that everyone has a chance to learn from the experts. If you have binoculars and a butterfly net, please bring them along. Butterflies may be captured for identification and release. Rubber boots are recommended, as some of the sites have a lot of poison ivy. It is an all-day event so bring your lunch.

    Call Jeff Skevington Friday evening at 613-720-2862 if in doubt about the weather or for specific questions regarding this event. Use OFNC Facebook or Twitter to arrange car pooling. We plan to meet at 6 p.m. after the count for a compilation and pot luck dinner (location to be announced). Please bring along some food to share plus your own drinks. We hope that everyone can make it to the compilation, as it will be a lot of fun; however, if you can't, we will get your data in the afternoon before you leave.

  • Sun
    26
    Jun
    2016
    8:30 amMetro Parking Lot, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: 8:30 am in the parking lot of the Metro Store, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior. Park close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    This is a unique wetland which holds many of our native orchids and unusual insects too. Wet feet are guaranteed in the fen so old running shoes make perfect footwear on a hot day. Rubber boots would work too. It is a good idea to cover up with light clothing for protection against the sun and the biting insects. Bring a hand lens and binoculars if you have them. Expect to be out until early afternoon and bring lots of water and a lunch. There will be an ice cream stop along the way to our picnic area. Note: There will be a limited number of registrations accepted for this trip due to the sensitive nature of the fen habitat. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    07
    Jun
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Katie Clow, DVM, is a PhD Candidate at the University of Guelph examining the ecology of Lyme disease in Ontario, and a graduate from the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) at the University of Guelph.

    The Presentation:

    Dr. Clow will explore the key ecological factors associated with the blacklegged tick and Lyme disease in Ontario. Emphasis will be placed on the role of habitat, climate and wildlife for the establishment and spread of this emerging disease. Some of the common myths and misconceptions of Lyme disease will be discussed. Participants will be provided with practical knowledge on how to protect themselves from blacklegged ticks, while still enjoying the great outdoors.

    Biography:

    Dr. Katie Clow graduated from the Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) at the University of Guelph in 2011. During veterinary school, she completed internships at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Following graduation, she practiced small animal medicine in Renfrew, ON. In the fall of 2013, Katie began her PhD thesis examining the ecology of Lyme disease in Ontario in order to better understand and predict the distribution and spread of the disease. She has a keen interest in veterinary public health, and hopes to continue her career in academia, with a strong focus on vector-borne disease research, teaching and international development.

  • Wed
    01
    Jun
    2016
    6:30 pmWest Carleton Secondary School, 3088 Dunrobin Road

    Leader:  Art Goldsmith

    Meet:  at the front door of West Carleton Secondary School at 6:15 pm.  We will walk back to the Bill Mason Centre from there.

    Target species in the wetland will be Wilson’s Snipe, American Bittern, Virginia Rail and Sora. In the forest and fields we should see a variety of songbirds and woodpeckers. There will be mosquitoes so cover up and bring repellent. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sun
    22
    May
    2016
    10:00 amMacnamara Trail

    Calling all Young Naturalists, the forest of late spring looks very different than the forest of midsummer. With the leaves not quite unfurled on the deciduous trees, wildflowers burst from the ground and set bloom fast while sun still floods the forest floor.

    Join us to see the ephemeral spring flowers and to observe other signs of late spring at the Macnamara trail. We'll be taking notes, and doing some drawings to compare with a later walk at the same location.

    In the meantime, if you want to learn about a neat interaction between ants and flowers, check out the elaisome.

    Please register by email at youngmacs@mfnc.ca

    NOTE: THIS EVENT HAS NOW BEEN CANCELLED.

  • Sat
    14
    May
    2016
    8:00am-12:00pmDunrobin area

    Directions: From the Dunrobin Road turn onto Riddell Drive.  Drive down Riddell about 5km to where it swings sharp left and becomes the 6thLine. There is a flashing amber light here and a driveway on the right leading to the locked DND gates.  Pull in here and wait at the gate. Someone will meet us at the gate at 8:00 so please arrive a few minutes before that to check in with Maureen.

    The Innis Point Bird Observatory was founded in 1982 and is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of birds and natural history. We will have the opportunity to learn about the important research and monitoring activities occurring there and to observe bird banding at this busy time of the year when migration is at a peak. The site is on the Ottawa River and is wet and rocky in places. Dress for the weather and wear appropriate footwear. The trip will be limited to the first 24 members who register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    03
    May
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Naomi Cappuccino is an associate professor at Carleton University where she teaches a variety of courses in the general areas of ecology and evolution.

    The Presentation:

    Dog- strangling vine is one of the most invasive alien plants in Ontario. Naomi Cappuccino will share the results of research conducted in collaboration with her students and colleagues to understand what characteristics give this plant such an advantage over native vegetation and make it so difficult to eradicate. The potential for biological control of the vine using herbivores brought in from its native range in Ukraine will also be discussed.

    Biography:

    Naomi Cappuccino is an associate professor at Carleton University where she teaches a variety of courses in the general areas of ecology and evolution.  Naomi obtained a BA in Biology from Brown University and a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University. Her interests include the ecology of invasive alien plants and insects and how best to control these pest species. Together with colleagues at the Central Experimental Farm, she has been involved with the recent releases of biological control agents that attack dog-strangling vine, the lily leaf beetle and the leek moth.

  • Sun
    17
    Apr
    2016
    7pm-9pmWoodlawn/Dunrobin

    Meet: On Stonecrest Rd, at the corner of MacLaren Side Rd.  Park on the side of the road.

    Join members of the club to welcome the sounds of spring as we search for Spring Peepers, Chorus Frogs, Wood Frogs, Spotted Salamanders, various bugs and other creatures which seem to come alive as the ponds finally melt. We will visit ponds in two different places in the Woodlawn-Dunrobin area. Wear your highest rubber boots, if you have some, dress warmly, bring a flashlight and a net if you have one. Bring the kids.  This will be a very “kid-friendly” event and will tie in well with the Young Macs’ outing on Saturday! Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    16
    Apr
    2016
    1:00 pmKinburn area

    Salamander Conservationist  Matt Ellerbeck (A.K.A the Salamander Man) will be joining the Young Macs and interested adults for an insightful talk on nature's tailed amphibians...the salamanders!

    The presentation will feature live species both local and exotic!

    Matt Ellerbeck is licensed with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and is also a Partner of the Amphibian Survival Alliance (ASA), which is the world's largest partnership for amphibian conservation.

    Directions to the location will follow upon registration. Register by email to youngmacs@mfnc.ca

  • Sun
    10
    Apr
    2016
    7:00 pmArnprior/Pakenham

    Leader:  Michael Runtz

    Meet:  in the Metro store parking lot, 375 Daniel St., Arnprior.  Park opposite the store but close to the road.  We will carpool from there.

    Michael will lead us to several locations where we can expect to find owls. Target species are:  Barred Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl and Eastern Screech-Owl. Along the way we will learn about the ecology and behaviour of these beautiful and fascinating birds.  Dress very warmly; we will be standing outside for periods of time.  Register at events@mfnc.ca  NOTE: EVERYONE WHO HAD REGISTERED FOR THE ORIGINAL DATE IS ASKED TO RE-REGISTER FOR THE April 10 OUTING.

  • Tue
    05
    Apr
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Colin Jones is a lifelong naturalist and is the Provincial Arthropod Zoologist at the Natural Heritage Information Centre, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in Peterborough, Ontario.

    The Presentation:

    Dragonflies and damselflies are beautiful and truly fascinating creatures! From the Ebony Jewelwing to the Stygian Shadowdragon, these insects are not only an important part of our ecosystem, they are also exciting to watch. Colin Jones will be presenting a talk, complete with photographs, on the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Ontario during which he will highlight their fascinating life cycle, their conservation, the habitats they are found in and how you can learn more about them yourselves by getting out there and watching them first-hand.

    Biography:

    Colin Jones – Colin is a lifelong naturalist and is the Provincial Arthropod Zoologist at the Natural Heritage Information Centre, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in Peterborough where he deals primarily with rare species. Like many naturalists, Colin first developed a keen interest in birds and birding but this interest gradually grew into other areas. Over the past 25 years, he has been very interested in the study of Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies). He is coordinator of the Ontario Odonata Atlas project and is the co-author of “A Field Guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Algonquin Provincial Park and Surrounding Area”, now in its 2nd edition.

  • Sat
    19
    Mar
    2016
    1:00 p.m.- 2:30 p.m. Kinburn

    Saturday, March 19: Wildlife in a Sugarbush

    Young Macs and adults will meet at a family sugarbush to see how it operates, and to look for signs of wildlife including snapped maple branches from squirrels hoping for treats, insects attracted to the sap buckets, footprints in the snow (depending on the level) or even other critters appearing from the leaf litter. All going well, we'll also be boiling and have some of the sweet stuff available for sampling.

    Register by email to youngmacs@mfnc.ca

    Directions will be provided upon registration.

  • Tue
    01
    Mar
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Dr.  Grégory Bulté is a biology instructor at Carleton University where he teaches lecture-based and field courses about animal biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology.

    The Presentation:

    The reproductive behaviours of aquatic turtles are poorly understood due to the difficulties of studying these animals under natural conditions. Since 2003, I have been studying the ecology and behaviour of the northern map turtle in lake Opinicon. Using a wide range of field techniques, my collaborators and myself have uncovered many aspects of the reproductive biology of this fascinating creature. I will share with you the most exciting highlights of this on-going work as well as some tantilizing unanswered questions.

    Biography:

    Grégory Bulté is a biology instructor at Carleton University where he teaches lecture-based and field courses in the areas of animal biology, ecology, and evolutionary biology. He is particularly interested in the behaviour, conservation, and natural history of amphibians and reptiles and has been spearheading a long-term ecological study on the northern map turtle in lake Opinicon. Grégory first completed a college degree in biological techniques which ignited his interest for wildlife research. He then completed an undergraduate degree in biology at l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières followed by a PhD in biology at the university of Ottawa, and a post-doctoral fellowship at Carleton University.

  • Sun
    28
    Feb
    2016
    1:00 - 4:00Fitzroy Provincial Park

    Due to an unfavourable weather forecast for Feb. 28, this event is cancelled. New date to be determined.

    Host: Karen Krueger

    Meet:  227 Kedey Street, Fitzroy Harbour.  Park on the street or at the end of the street.

    Karen will show us some of her favourite spots in the park where we should find lots of tracks and signs of animals as they go about their winter activities. We will look for Bald Eagles and other birds, visit a waterfall and a beaver pond.

    After the outing we are invited back to Karen's for snacks and hot drinks. Karen has cats and a dog, all of which are friendly, but please keep this in mind if you have allergies. Bring your snowshoes and the kids for this activity. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    02
    Feb
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    A highlight annual event.  Combine learning, laughter and camaraderie. NO experience is necessary! Puns welcome.  If you are good at riddles, Michael's are the BEST-challenging, evocative and ever so finely crafted.

    With Art away sweating in the wilds of Florida, will Gord win AGAIN?  Is there a young, dynamic, capable team ready to conquer all? Much more fun than watching the usual hockey game.

    Who will win the coveted Seton Cup (we don't have one yet, but if you want to bring one and have it engraved, you are welcome)?

    Come and find out. This is an awesome and exhilarating way to learn about local natural history. Michael’s contagious enthusiasm, his keen insight into the intricacies of nature, and the countless anecdotes of his experiences as a naturalist always make for a very entertaining evening. Participants will be divided into teams that will compete to answer riddles and identify items from nature.

     

  • Sun
    24
    Jan
    2016
    1:30 - 4:30Carp

    Sunday, January 24, 1:30pm - 4:30pm: Exploring Nature on Snowshoes in the Carp Hills

    Leaders: Jeff Skevington and Gord Vogg
    Host: Janet Mason

    Meet: at the W. Erskine Johnston Arena in Carp beside the charitable donation bin and carpool from there for a 15 minute drive to the property.

    On this field trip you are invited to explore a 297 acre private property in the heart of the Carp Hills, the only expression of Canadian Shield within City of Ottawa boundaries.  Beaver ponds and lodges, gneissic outcrops, Provincially Significant Wetlands, and rugged pine/oak uplands are showcased.  We will look for signs of animals and learn how they survive through the winter. Bring your binoculars since we expect to see several species of birds, perhaps a ruffed grouse or raptor among them. We will also learn to recognize shrubs and trees in their winter garb. It is a great opportunity to explore this beautiful landscape, which becomes more accessible on snowshoes. This will be a fairly strenuous excursion but kids old enough to handle the activity are encouraged to join us. We are all invited back to Janet’s for hot drinks after the outing.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    16
    Jan
    2016
    1:00 - 5:00Arnprior

    Postponed to January 16 due to unfavourable weather in the forecast.

    Leader: Jon Ruddy

    Meet: at the Metro parking lot, Daniel St., Arnprior. Park opposite the store but close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    We will travel by car from downtown Arnprior to nearby areas where we might expect to see birds of prey. Red-tailed Hawks, Rough-legged Hawks, Snowy Owls, Northern Shrikes, and Bald Eagles are all possibilities. And we can always hope for the rare and unexpected - even a Golden Eagle or a Gyrfalcon! Dress warmly as we will be standing outside for periods of time. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    05
    Jan
    2016
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior, ON

    We are looking forward to learning all about your prized nature or natural history possessions or experiences! Please sign in at the door with the item or topic you wish to showcase. If you are showing photos, there should not be more than five and they should be on a USB key. You may also bring prints to put on a table. Donations welcome from non-presenters ( a Loonie or Twonie, please).

  • Sat
    26
    Dec
    2015

    If you wish to be included in this all-day event, please contact Michael Runtz at mruntz@start.ca   Binoculars and some birding experience are essential. It will be followed by a pot-luck dinner at the Arnprior Curling Club and a celebration of Michael's 50th year of participation in this count.

  • Tue
    01
    Dec
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Note: This is our Annual General Meeting.  Club business precedes our regular agenda of sightings and our presentation.

    Our Presenter: Dr. Stacey Robinson is a Research Scientist at Environment Canada’s National Wildlife Research Centre in Ottawa.

    Neonicotinoids and Their Effects on Amphibians

    The Presentation:

    Neonicotinoids are a new class of insecticide used in agriculture and can contaminate surface waters via run-off from fields. In recent years, the use of neonicotinoids has been speculatively linked to the collapses of honey bee colonies. Given that neonicotinoids are now the most widely-used insecticides worldwide, with substantial use in Canada, and persist in the environment, there is potential for widespread contamination of agriculture-associated aquatic ecosystems. My project examined the health impacts of neonicotinoid pesticides on aquatic ecosystems by studying the sub-lethal effects on amphibians, specifically wood frogs and northern leopard frogs.

    Biography:

    Stacey is a Research Scientist at Environment Canada’s National Wildlife Research Centre in Ottawa. Her research program focusses on studying the effects of pesticides and other contaminants on non-target wildlife. Stacey completed her PhD in 2011 at Carleton University where she studied the relationships between contaminants and parasites in double-crested cormorants. Stacey grew up on a hobby farm near Russell, Ontario and her childhood consisted of raising farm animals and camping with her family. She has always been fascinated and appreciative of the natural environment. Her first experiences of field research involved following white-throated sparrows through the forests of Prince George, British Columbia. She was studying the birds’ parasite infections for her undergraduate thesis at Wilfrid Laurier University. Stacey was always encouraged by her parents to follow her passions and she now has her dream job at Environment Canada.

    staceywoodfrog

    One of Stacey's Wood Frogs, spending its first day as an adult.

  • Sat
    07
    Nov
    2015
    9:30 amMacnamara Trail Kiosk

    Leader: Steve Duffield

    Meet: in the parking lot of the Macnamara Trail

    Come for the morning or only part of the morning if you can spare an hour or two. Bring loppers and pruning shears if you have them. Work gloves, sturdy footwear and water are essential. Please register.

  • Tue
    03
    Nov
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Our Presenter: Dr. Jeff Skevington is a research scientist at the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes (with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) and an Adjunct Professor at Carleton and Guelph Universities.

    The Presentation:

     Including over ten percent of all described animal life on the planet it behooves us as naturalists to know a bit about flies. With 160,000 described species and over 10 times that number undescribed, flies occupy every imaginable ecological niche. The ‘bad’ flies are actually very small in number but have shaped human history and development across the planet. Malaria transmitted by flies has kept parts of Africa, the Orient and South America wild and continues to kill enormous numbers of us annually. In Canada, some areas are off limits for ranching as the stock would be killed by biting flies. But even more than the negatives, flies provide enormous economic advantages for us. Pollinator flies are second only to bees in their role in agriculture and some foods like chocolate are entirely reliant on pollinator flies. Decomposition and sewage treatment are dominated by Diptera (the scientific name for flies). I will take you on a walk through this jungle of diversity and along the way will throw out as many fascinating nature nuggets as possible about this amazing group of animals. What is that swelling on your favourite chipmunk’s groin? Why does Hollywood love flies? How many fruit flies can one female and her progeny produce in a year? What fly species provides one of the biggest tourist attractions in New Zealand? How many mosquito species are there in Canada? How long does it take for flies turn a dump truck full of oranges into compost? How about an animal carcass? What flies provide nuptial gifts to their partners (tips you won’t find on Ashley Maddison!)? How can you identify and learn more about species of animals that form such a staggering diversity? Bring any flies or photos of flies you have been curious to learn about and we will try to figure out what they are. I will even bring some pinned fly specimens from the Canadian National Collection for show and tell before and after the presentation.

    Biography:

    Jeff has been a research scientist at the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes (with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) since 2003. He is also an adjunct professor at Carleton University and University of Guelph where he has been involved with training and mentoring over 50 of the next generation of biologists and in particular insect systematists. His research specializes on the taxonomy and phylogenetics of flies, in particular flower/hover flies (Syrphidae), big-headed flies (Pipunculidae) and thick-headed flies (Conopidae). Jeff did his training at the University of Guelph with Steve Marshall (MSc) and the University of Queensland with David Yeates (PhD). He has maintained an Australian slant to his research since his time living there. Australia is the true frontier for insect taxonomists as most of the fauna remains to be discovered and described. Jeff has published over 100 research articles, book chapters and books. Many can be downloaded from his website (www.canacoll.org/Diptera/Staff/Skevington/Skevington.htm). Jeff ‘s trajectory as a naturalist started with insects at a very early age, diversified into birds at age 8, and expanded to include all things natural during his undergraduate days as a park naturalist first at Algonquin and then at Pinery. Mentors in the Woodstock and St. Thomas Field-Naturalists’ Clubs had a lot to do with shaping his interests and directions but as with many naturalists, it was his experience in Algonquin that solidified his goals and his work with Steve Marshall that really turned him on to insects.

  • Sun
    18
    Oct
    2015
    12:00 pmMorris Island Conservation Area

    Leader: Dave Forsyth

    Meet: Morris Island Conservation Area, 156 Morris Island Drive

    We will look at marble mineralogy, the glacial legacy (the best pothole specimens anywhere) and metamorphic structures. How has this geology affected glacial processes and the present day forest and aquatic habitats? You may find it helpful to look over the information on our website, beforehand, about the geology of the island. On the homepage, see “More Information”, “Macnamara Trail”, “Geology Field Guides”. Register for this outing at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    17
    Oct
    2015
    10:30 amFitzroy Provincial Park

    Join the Young Macs as they watch the geese and ducks prepare to fly to their winter feeding grounds. We’ll discuss their amazing journeys along with the dynamics of feathers and flight.

    Register with Telsing Andrews at youngmacs@mfnc.ca

    Meet at Karen Kroeger’s: 227 Kedey Street, Fitzroy Harbour. It’s a short walk from there to the waterfront in Fitzroy Provincial Park. Karen’s number is 613-622-1626.

    Be sure to check the Macnamara website before heading out on Saturday in case there are any last-minute changes.

    All ages welcome! And hot chocolate back at Karen’s after the outing!

  • Sat
    17
    Oct
    2015
    10:30 amFitzroy Provincial Park

    Join the Young Macs as they watch the geese and ducks prepare to fly to their winter feeding grounds. We’ll discuss their amazing journeys along with the dynamics of feathers and flight.

    Register with Telsing Andrews at youngmacs@mfnc.ca

    Meet at Karen Kroeger’s: 227 Kedey Street, Fitzroy Harbour. It’s a short walk from there to the waterfront in Fitzroy Provincial Park. Karen’s number is 613-622-1626.

    Be sure to check the Macnamara website before heading out on Saturday in case there are any last-minute changes.

    All ages welcome! And hot chocolate back at Karen’s after the outing!

  • Tue
    06
    Oct
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Our Presenter: Dr. Myron L Smith is the Chair of the Biology Department at Carleton University.

    The Presentation:

    The Fungi comprise an enigmatic group of organisms that is most closely related to the animal kingdom. Fungi are familiar to most of us as moulds and mushrooms, but we tend to overlook their profound impacts on human affairs as plant and animal pathogens and symbionts, in industrial fermentation processes, as decomposers and as research subjects. In this talk, I will provide a brief overview of the functional and structural diversity of fungi, and highlight some surprising aspects of their biology, genetics and behaviour.

    Biography:

    Dr. Smith served as the Director of the Institute of Biochemistry from 2002-2007 and is a member of the Institute of Environmental Science. Dr. Smith teaches courses in general and molecular genetics, biotechnology, mycology and molecular ecology. His research encompasses genetics, molecular biology, microbiology and general biology and focuses on four main themes: i) deciphering the biochemical and genetic bases of non self recognition-associated cell death, ii) identification and characterization of new antibiotics from ethnobotanical leads and from agroforestry and bioprocessing ‘waste’ for use in health, food and industrial applications, iii) development of methods to identify and enumerate microbial strains for environmental monitoring, and iv) application of genetic markers to life history studies. This research spans questions of basic biological interest and has biotechnology applications in diverse areas that include health, agrifood industry, environmental contaminants, and biofuel developments.

    Dr. Smith obtained his Bachelor’s degree in Botany at the University of Alberta and his PhD at the University of Toronto at Mississauga, specializing in genetics within the Biotechnology Program. Following his Ph.D., Dr. Smith received NSERC and Killam Post-Doctoral Fellowships to carry out genetics research in the Biotechnology Laboratories at the University of British Columbia.

  • Thu
    24
    Sep
    2015
    4:00 pmShirley's Bay Boat Launch

    Leader: Jon Ruddy

    Meet: P1 parking lot at the Shirley’s Bay boat launch at the end of Rifle Rd.

    We will explore the river near the parking lot for waterfowl and raptors then head onto the trails to look for local and migrating birds in the forest. At this time of year we should find a good variety of species. The trails lead to a causeway where migrating shore birds can be found in the shallow water nearby.

    Bring binoculars and drinking water. The trails are relatively flat and easy to walk but sturdy shoes are recommended. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Sat
    12
    Sep
    2015
    10:00 am

    Hosts: Katharine and Eric Fletcher

    Meet: 9AM at Liza Badham’s home, (5689 Ferry Rd.) to carpool and take the Quyon Ferry to the Fletcher property, Spiritwood, 4316 chemin Steele, OR meet us there at 10AM if you are coming from another direction.

    Katharine and Eric will introduce us to their 100-acre home farm, Spiritwood, where they have lived since 1989. Katharine is a visual artist, freelance writer & columnist, and author of several books including: Capital Rambles, Capital Walks, and Historical Walks: The Gatineau Park Story. Together, Katharine and Eric have authored: Québec Off The Beaten Path. Eric is a professional photographer, computer specialist and publications/document manager.

    Spiritwood enjoys rich biodiversity: meadows, paddocks for two horses, a pond, wetland and mixed forest — which backs into the southwest “wilderness” sector of Gatineau Park. With plenty of verges, as well as open meadowland and woods, the Fletchers find many species of birds, including Eastern Whip-poor-will, American Bittern, Bobolink, Eastern Bluebird and 3 species of Swallow. Also seen on the property are mink, otter, fisher, deer, black bear, bobcat, green frogs (along with the uncommon blue morph), salamanders and more.

    Katharine and Eric invite us to come, wander their trails, climb the escarpment edge and look out over the Ottawa Valley to the Ottawa River — and beyond. In September, the leaves will be turning so expect beautiful views. Bring a lunch, binoculars, comfortable footwear, and your knowledge and appreciation of nature to share.

  • Sun
    06
    Sep
    2015
    10:30 amMacnamara Trail Kiosk

    Join Telsing Andrews at the Macnamara Trailhead as the Young Macnamara Field Naturalists explore seed dispersal — from those that hitch a ride on your socks to those that explode to new locations.

    Register at youngmacs@mfnc.ca and address any questions about the outing to this address as well.

    Be sure to check the Macnamara website before heading out on Sunday in case there are any last-minute changes.

    All ages welcome!

  • Tue
    01
    Sep
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Our Presenter: Éric Hébert-Daly, National Executive Director, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society.

    The Presentation:

    Public conservation in Canada takes a long time from start to finish. And while the processes move along slowly, development and encroachment happen quickly and often outpace our ability to plan. Southern Canada, in particular in our own region, has significant additional pressures, but they all have one thing in common: poor or non-existent planning. Where are the connections between protected areas for wildlife? Where are the buffer zones needed to ensure healthy ecosystems? We are no where near our international commitments to conservation – both in quality and in quantity. How do we get there from here?
    Biography:

    Éric has been CPAWS’ National Executive Director since April 2009. He was previously Executive Director and Chief Financial Officer for one of Canada’s major political parties. Éric is fluently bilingual, a graduate of Concordia University’s School of Community and Public Affairs, and a Certified Lay Worship Leader for the United Church. He has worked with municipal, regional and national groups across Canada and has focussed his attention on social justice, ecological and human rights issues throughout his career. Éric is an avid cyclist and hiker and has travelled extensively throughout Canada, with a particular interest in remote and northern regions from Labrador to Inuvik. He enjoys canoeing, cross-country skiing and camping, as well as his home life shared with his partner on the north edge of Gatineau Park near Ottawa.

  • Sat
    08
    Aug
    2015
    9:00 amOttawa Street entrance to Gillies Grove

    Leader: Steve Duffield

    Meet: 9AM at the Ottawa Street entrance to Gilles Grove, Arnprior

    As a follow-up to the recent presentation to our club by Gary Bell from the Nature Conservancy of Canada, a trip through one of the Conservancy’s properties, Gillies Grove, which he discussed, is in order. We will wander through the trails to see the magnificent old trees of this park, which was spared the fate of the surrounding forest because it was part of the Gillies homestead. One Eastern White Pine on the property was recently named the tallest tree in Ontario. Along the way we will likely see birds, butterflies and dragonflies so bring your binoculars. Water, insect protection and sun protection are essential.

  • Sat
    11
    Jul
    2015
    10:00 amMorris Island Conservation Area

    Leader: Christian Renault

    Meet: 10 AM in the parking lot of the Conservation Area on Morris Island Drive.

    This area with trails along the Ottawa River should provide excellent opportunities to find many different species of dragonflies and damselflies at this time of year. Sturdy footwear is recommended for these trails but the trails are relatively flat and easy to walk. Bring a lunch, sun and insect protection. We expect to be at the site for about 3 hours.

  • Sat
    27
    Jun
    2015
    8:30 amMetro Parking Lot, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: 8:30 am in the parking lot of the Metro Store, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior. Park close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    This is a unique wetland which holds many of our native orchids and unusual insects too. Wet feet are guaranteed in the fen so old running shoes make perfect footwear on a hot day. Rubber boots would work too. It is a good idea to cover up with light clothing for protection against the sun and the biting insects. Bring a hand lens and binoculars if you have them. Expect to be out for most of the day and bring lots of water and a lunch. There will be an ice cream stop along the way to our picnic area. Note: There will be a limited number of registrations accepted for this trip due to the sensitive nature of the fen habitat.

  • Sun
    14
    Jun
    2015
    2:00 pmConstance Bay Community Centre

    Leaders: Owen Clarkin and Art Goldsmith

    Meet: 2pm at the Constance Bay Community Centre

    The Torbolton Sandhills host unique flora and fauna. Bring out the whole family for a walk in the Torbolton Forest and learn more about the natural history of this area.

  • Wed
    03
    Jun
    2015
    6:00 pmWest Carleton Secondary School, 3088 Dunrobin Road

    Target species in the wetland will be Wilson’s Snipe, American Bittern, Virginia Rail and Sora. In the forest and fields we should see a variety of songbirds and woodpeckers. There will be mosquitoes so cover up and bring repellent.

  • Tue
    02
    Jun
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Gary Bell, Conservation Biologist – Eastern Ontario,  Nature Conservancy of Canada, will update us and present to us about Gillies Grove and the Gervais property, near Westmeath, Ontario, which has been purchased with a generous donations from the Ottawa Field Naturalist Club supplemented by a donation by our Club. Join us to better understand the importance of these NCC properties supported by our Club.

    Did you know the Ottawa River Valley is home to the longest underwater cave system in Canada? Beneath the surface lies a subterranean wonderland seldom seen by the human eye – the Ottawa River Caves. The labyrinth measures over 10 kilometres in length under several islands throughout the Ottawa River, and includes a four kilometre section on the Ontario side of the river known as the Gervais Caves.  The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) purchased the 82-acre Gervais Caves property in January 2015 protecting most of the entrances to the caves on the Ontario side.  The property also protects important karst landforms, sinkholes and a diversity of species, including rare and at risk species.

    Come and hear the latest on the Gillies Grove Nature Reserve, including current stewardship actions, initiatives and partnerships and our recent, record-breaking discovery.

  • Tue
    12
    May
    2015
    1:00 pmTrailhead at Old Second Line and Klondike Road, Kanata

    Join keen members of the club on a hike through the extensive trails of this lovely area. Here we should find a great variety of the ephemeral flowers of spring, before they disappear in early summer when the tree leaves shade the forest floor. Bring a hand lens and wildflower guide if you have them. Binoculars would also come in handy since there should be time to listen and look for birds. Prepare for mosquitoes and bring water and a snack.

  • Sat
    09
    May
    2015

    This will be an all-day outing in the park where we will watch for spring migrants. There should be a good variety of warblers by this time of year. We will begin early in the morning so it is advisable to stay in the area overnight Friday. There are accommodations nearby and camping is available in the park.

    There will be a small fee required to cover the expenses of our group leader, likely about $10 per adult, and there is a fee to enter the park.

  • Tue
    05
    May
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Dr. Valerie Behan-Pelletier, an Honorary Research Associate (an Emeritus position) with the Research Branch of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, will present: Have you eaten any soil lately? Soil, where oribatid mites live and where our food begins...

    We live on the rooftops of a hidden world. In one handful of rich organic soil lives a greater diversity than in a coral reef – soil is the “poor man’s tropical rainforest”. It is the luxuriant tapestry that ensures life on earth; it is where most of our food begins. Yet, soils are possibly the least understood of the planet’s ecosystems, and the most fragile, and are increasingly among the most degraded ecosystems in many parts of the world.

    Dr. Behan-Pelletier will use oribatid mites, one of the most diverse groups of mites in soil, to show the interactions of animals in this ecosystem. 2015 is the International Year of Soil; she will illustrate how soil is the critical transition between the Earth’s terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and how a biodiverse soil provides the essential ecosystem services, including carbon and nutrient cycling, decomposition of dead organic matter; biocontrol and development of soil structure to ensure plant growth. Oribatid mites are a key component of this soil biodiversity, and among the most beautiful.

    This talk will illustrate the latest knowledge on the biological complexity of oribatid mites. It will focus on their ecology, their defense mechanisms, and their diversity in the dynamic interplay that is the soil ecosystem. It will show how they and other charismatic microfauna are contributing to our quality of life.

  • Fri
    17
    Apr
    2015
    7:00 pmStonecrest Road, at the corner of MacLaren Side Road

    Leader: Jakob Mueller

    Meet: 7 p.m. on Stonecrest Road, at the corner of MacLaren Side Road. Park on the side of the road.

    Welcome the sounds of spring as we search for Spring Peepers, Chorus Frogs, Wood Frogs, Spotted Salamanders, various bugs and other creatures that seem to come alive as the ponds finally melt. We will visit ponds in two different places in the Woodlawn-Dunrobin area. Wear your highest rubber boots, if you have some, dress warmly and bring a flashlight. Bring the kids; this will be a very “kid-friendly” event!

  • Sun
    29
    Mar
    2015
    7:00 pmMetro Parking Lot, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior

    Meet at 7 p.m. in the parking lot of the Metro store, 375 Daniel Street South, Arnprior. Park away from the store, close to Daniel Street. From the parking lot we will carpool and then drive to several locations where we will search for owls. Dress very warmly; we will be standing outside the cars for periods of time. Target species will be Barred and Northern Saw-whet Owls, and Eastern Screech-Owls. Along the way, expect to learn more about these fascinating birds from Michael as he discusses their ecology and behaviour.

  • Tue
    03
    Mar
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Dr. Brent Patterson,  a research scientist with the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and an adjunct professor at Trent University will provide a presentation on: Wolves and Coyotes in Ontario. Brent  joined the MNRF as a research scientist in 2001 and has been an adjunct professor at Trent University since that time as well.  His research involves studying wolves, coyotes, deer and moose in both temperate and boreal regions.  Prior to joining the MNR Brent worked for 3 years as a biologist for the Government of Nunavut in the central Canadian Arctic where he worked with caribou, muskox and wolverine.  Brent has a M.S. in Wildlife and Conservation Biology from Acadia University, and a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Saskatchewan.

  • Sun
    01
    Mar
    2015
    1:00 pm227 Kedey Street, Fitzroy Harbour

    Host: Karen Krueger

    Park at the house, on the street, or at the end of the street. There is a dead end not far from the house. Join us for a nature outing on snowshoes through some of the trails of Fitzroy Provincial Park where we should see many winter birds and find lots of tracks and other signs of mammals going about their daily activities. We’ll walk along the banks of the Carp River to a spot where bald eagles are sometimes spotted and past a beaver pond. We’ll see “shale pillars that stand as testaments to the erosive power of water.” And visit a lovely frozen waterfall surrounded by ancient cedar trees. If we’re lucky, we’ll see the pair of pileated woodpeckers that frequent the park. After the outing, join us for a social gathering back at the home of Karen Krueger. Karen has three friendly cats and a friendly dog. Please keep this in mind if you have allergies. Bring snowshoes and a snack; hot drinks will be provided.

  • Fri
    06
    Feb
    2015

    Leaders: Dr. Fred Schueler and Aleta Karstad

    Meet: 5:30PM at the Brigadoon Restaurant in Oxford Mills (if you wish to have dinner there beforehand) OR meet there at 7:30PM for a brief talk before heading out to see the Mudpuppies nearby. The restaurant has directions on its website.

    After we are introduced to these amazing large salamanders we will go to the water below the dam, where the Mudpuppies venture out after dark to feed on the flat bedrock. This is the best Mudpuppy viewing site in Ontario and there should be plenty of opportunity to examine them up close. Expect to be outside for at least an hour, either near, or preferably in, the shallow water. Dress very warmly and wear your tallest waterproof boots. Bring a strong flashlight if you have one. Register at events@mfnc.ca and please indicate whether or not you will be coming for dinner.

  • Tue
    03
    Feb
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    This is an interesting and entertaining way to learn about local natural history. Michael’s contagious enthusiasm, his keen insight into the intricacies of nature, and the countless anecdotes of his experiences as a naturalist always make for a very entertaining evening. Participants will be divided into teams that will compete to answer riddles and identify specimens.

  • Sat
    24
    Jan
    2015
    10:00 amMetro Parking Lot, 375 Daniel Street, Arnprior

    Leader: Owen Clarkin

    Park close to the road, away from the store. We will carpool from there to the Nature Preserve. We will walk or snowshoe the beautiful trails of High Lonesome in the Pakenham Highlands. Footwear will be dependent on the amount of snowfall we have beforehand, so please check this website before heading out. Our emphasis will be on trees in winter but we will also look for signs of animals and watch for birds. Bring along a hand lens and binoculars if you have them. There is an old barn where we can find shelter for lunch; bring food and water. After lunch we will head back to the trails until about 2pm.

  • Tue
    06
    Jan
    2015
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    We are looking forward to learning all about your prized nature or natural history possessions or experiences! Please sign in at the door with the item or topic you wish to showcase. If you are showing photos, there should not be more than five and they should be on a USB key. You may also bring prints to put on a table.

  • Fri
    26
    Dec
    2014

    The annual bird count is being held on Boxing Day. We are looking for participants with at least minimal experience in identifying birds. Participants are assigned an area to cover and are paired so no one goes alone. It is a full day event with a pot-luck dinner/compilation afterwards.

  • Sat
    01
    Nov
    2014
    9:00 amMacnamara Trail Kiosk

    Many thanks to all who participated!

    This will be an all-morning activity but drop by even if you can only spare an hour or two. We will be adding wood chips to the trail so bring a shovel and wheelbarrow if you have them. Loppers and pruning sheers would be useful too.

  • Sat
    18
    Oct
    2014
    12:30 pm

    Leader: Dave Forsyth

    Beneath the mud, clays and Ordovician sediments, all of Arnprior is underlain by Precambrian marble. From the mid 1800s until perhaps 1900, marble from Arnprior quarries was fashioned into monuments, urns, pedestals, columns, tabletops, baptismal fonts, headstones and even blocks for the first Houses of Parliament. This tour will help us appreciate: the marble sites within Arnprior, the people involved in the industry, some off their products and the significance of Arnprior’s “Marble Industry”.

  • Sun
    05
    Oct
    2014
    10:00 amOttawa Street entrance to Gillies Grove

    Leader: Richard Aaron

    Come on a fungal excursion through Gillies Grove. There should be lots of things growing in all sorts of colours, shapes and sizes. We may even see some slime moulds. Bring field guides and a magnifying lens if you have one, plus water and a lunch.

  • Tue
    03
    Jun
    2014
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club

    Our presenter is Wildlife/Species at Risk Biologist at Garrison Petawawa.

    The Kirtland’s Warbler is an endangered song bird that was considered to be one the rarest birds in the world.  In Canada there were only 18 documented sightings in breeding habitat up until 2005.  In 2006, it was re-discovered at Garrison Petawawa (formerly CFB Petawawa).  Since then, the Department of National Defence has been surveying, monitoring, and protecting Kirtland’s Warblers.  Birds have been returning and nesting on the Army facility.