Events & Meetings

October 21, 2015

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free! Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.  
  • Tue
    06
    Mar
    2018
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Jordan Mallon is a Research Scientist in Palaeobiology at the Canadian Museum of Nature

    The Presentation:

    This talk will present recent advances in dinosaur ecology (where they lived, what they ate, when they were active, etc.), with a focus on the new technologies and fossil finds that have combined to inform our understanding.

    Biography:

    Jordan Mallon is a Research Scientist in Palaeobiology at the Canadian Museum of Nature, and an Adjunct Research Professor at Carleton University. He received a B.Sc. from Carleton University and a Ph.D. from the University of Calgary.

    His primary research interests focus on the palaeoecology of herbivorous dinosaurs, and the evolution of horned dinosaurs, particularly those factors that influenced dinosaur diversity leading up to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (about 65 million years ago).

    By carefully examining feeding posture, skull and beak shape, jaw function and tooth wear, he has shown that diverse plant-eating dinosaurs living in Alberta 75 million years ago were able to coexist as a result of their varied dietary specializations.

    His varied fieldwork is primarily stationed in Alberta and Montana, with new activities planned in China for 2018.

  • Sun
    25
    Mar
    2018
    7:00 pmArnprior/Pakenham area

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: in the Metro store parking lot, 375 Daniel St., Arnprior. Park opposite the store but close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    Michael will lead us to several locations where we can expect to find owls. Target species are: Barred Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl and Eastern Screech-Owl. Along the way we will learn about the ecology and behaviour of these beautiful and fascinating birds. Dress very warmly; we will be standing outside for periods of time. Bring a flashlight and binoculars if you have them. The duration of this event will depend 0n the length of time it takes to find our target species.  Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    03
    Apr
    2018
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    David Sharpe is a research scientist at the Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa, specializing in the glacial geology of Canada. He has worked in many areas of the country including the Oak Ridges Moraine in southern Ontario and the Ottawa region.

    The Presentation:

    We will review the origin and nature of glaciation in Canada, including insights into a number areas in which we have details of glacial landforms and sediments. Then, we will review the application of this knowledge to mineral exploration, groundwater investigations and other applications to land use and construction.  We will also introduce an exciting new idea that, in addition to the glaciers, much of the glaciated Canadian landscape has been modified by very large glacial floods that discharged from under the continental ice sheets. Finally, the highlights of glaciation in the Ottawa valley will be reviewed.

    Biography:

    David Sharpe is a research scientist at the Geological Survey of Canada in Ottawa, specializing in the glacial geology of Canada as applied to mineral exploration and hydrogeology.  He has worked in many areas of the country including Arctic Canada, the barren lands, prairies and most parts of Ontario, including the Oak Ridges Moraine and the Ottawa region.  He has degrees in geology from the universities of Toronto, Colorado and Ottawa. He has been an adjunct professor at the universities of Waterloo and Ottawa, where he has also taught courses in glacial geology.

  • Tue
    01
    May
    2018
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Alex Sutton, a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, has always been interested in wildlife. He has focused his attention on studying population dynamics of bird populations by conducting research across North and Central America.

    The Presentation:

    Gray jays are an enigmatic bird of the Canadian boreal forest that is well adapted to not only survive, but thrive in harsh winter conditions. Since 1964, gray jays have been studied in Algonquin Provincial Park and this research has provided insight into their life history, behaviour and more recently about how their populations respond to climate change. This presentation will provide an overview of what we have learned from over 50 years of research studying gray jays living on the edge.

    Biography:

    Alex has always been interested in wildlife and the outdoors, but became especially interested in birds after beginning his B.Sc. in Zoology at the University of Guelph. This interest developed into a focus on studying population dynamics of wild populations by working on many research projects across North and Central America. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Guelph interested in understanding climatic and demographic drivers of population dynamics of Gray Jays in Algonquin Provincial Park.

  • Tue
    05
    Jun
    2018
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Gabriel Blouin-Demers is a Full Professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa. His main research efforts aim at explaining variation in density of animals across space and the evolutionary maintenance of polymorphism.  He works mostly on reptiles, but has published on all vertebrate classes and on insects.

    The Presentation:

    What is a reptile? What are the turtles, snakes, and lizards of Ontario? What is their conservation status? What are the main threats facing reptile populations? How can we help conserve reptile populations? These are the main questions Dr. Blouin-Demers will try to answer during his presentation.

    Biography:

    Gabriel Blouin-Demers obtained his B.Sc. from McGill University in 1996 and his Ph.D. from Carleton University in 2001. After a brief postdoctoral fellowship at The Ohio State University, he was hired at the University of Ottawa in 2002 where he currently is a Full Professor in the Department of Biology. His main research efforts aim at explaining variation in density of animals across space and the evolutionary maintenance of polymorphism, but he is also interested in conservation. He works mostly on reptiles, but he has published on all vertebrate classes and on insects. More information is available on his lab website: http://mysite.science.uottawa.ca/gblouin/labo.html.