Events & Meetings

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free!

Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.

 

  • Sat
    05
    Aug
    10am - 1pmArnprior

    Leader: Christian Renault

    Meet: exact location in Arnprior to be posted later

    We will explore areas along the Ottawa River and other habitats around Arnprior which should provide excellent opportunities to find many different species of dragonflies and damselflies at this time of year. Sturdy footwear is recommended but most locations are relatively flat and easy to walk. Bring a lunch, water and good protection for the sun and biting insects. Other items which will be useful: a bug net, field guide, binoculars. Register at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    05
    Sep
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Troy McMullinDr. Troy McMullin is a research scientist specializing in lichenology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. He focuses on the application of lichen taxonomy and systematics to a broad range of research areas. Troy received bachelor degrees in biology at Trent University, has a Bachelor of Education degree in biology and outdoor education from Queen’s University, and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Guelph. Troy has published extensively in academic journals and public media.

    The Presentation:

    Join Troy to explore the often overlooked, but beautiful and fascinating world of lichens. Learn about their roles in different ecosystems and how they are used in medicine, science, and space.  He will also cover rare lichens occurring in south-eastern Ontario, including the only species in the region that is federally (COSEWIC – Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada) listed as endangered, Pale-Bellied Frost Lichen (Physconia subpallida), which is known from the Arnprior area. You will gain a new appreciation for the small things in life!

    Biography:

    Dr. Troy McMullin is a research scientist specializing in lichenology at the Canadian Museum of Nature. He focuses on the application of lichen taxonomy and systematics to a broad range of research areas, including: biomonitoring, conservation, DNA barcoding, ethnobotany, restoration, sustainable forest management, woodland caribou habitat management, and more.

    Troy received bachelor degrees in biology at Trent University, has a Bachelor of Education degree in biology and outdoor education from Queen’s University, and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Guelph.

    Troy has published extensively in academic journals and public media. His latest co-authored book was recently released by the New York Botanical Garden Press, Common Lichens of Northeastern North America: A Field Guide.

  • Tue
    03
    Oct
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Steven Cooke is a Professor of Biology and Environmental Science and the Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology at Carleton University. His specialty is ecology and conservation physiology of fish, and he is best known for researching physiological responses in fish in regard to natural and human impacts. Dr. Cooke attained a Bachelor of Environmental Studies and a Master's in Biology at the University of Waterloo, and a PhD in Biology at the University of Illinois.

    The Presentation:

    Fish live in dynamic environments and respond accordingly by moving at various spatial and temporal scales.  For centuries these movements have been the basis of folk lore but only in the last few decades have we had the tools necessary to study fish across ocean basins, between the Laurentian Great Lakes, and up/down thousand kilometer river systems.  In this presentation, Dr. Cooke will describe the biotelemetry toolbox which has provided a window on the elusive and cryptic underwater world.

    Biography:

    Steven Cooke is a Professor of Biology and Environmental Science and the Canada Research Chair in Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology at Carleton University.  He attained a Bachelor of Environmental Studies and a Master's in Biology at the University of Waterloo, and a PhD in Biology at the University of Illinois.

    Dr. Cooke studies the ecology, behaviour, and physiology of wild fish in an effort to understand fundamental biological phenomena and to inform conservation and resource management.  Research in the Cooke Lab spans marine and freshwater systems and occurs locally (e.g., the Ottawa River, Kenauk Nature Reserve, the Rideau Canal), across Canada (from the Fraser River in BC to the marine waters of PEI), and the globe (e.g., active research projects in Norway, Denmark, India, Australia, The Bahamas, and more).  See www.fecpl.ca for more details on the Cooke Lab.

  • Tue
    05
    Dec
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Michael Runtz, an Arnprior native, is one of Canada’s best-known naturalists, nature photographers, and natural history authors. He is with the Department of Biology at Carleton University where he teaches an ever popular course in Natural History.

    The Presentation:

    Beavers are greatly misunderstood animals.  Their ability to cut down trees and flood land puts them in a less than favourable light in many peoples’ eyes but these attributes endow beavers with the power to create entire ecosystems. This highly visual presentation will explore the fascinating life of beavers and the important roles they play in the lives of other animals as diverse as dragonflies and moose.

    Biography:

    Michael Runtz, an Arnprior native, is one of Canada’s best-known naturalists, nature photographers, and natural history authors. A birdwatcher since the age of five, he has lived, breathed and worked with nature all his life. A dynamic communicator, he is equally at home in the television or radio studio, lecture hall or classroom. Since its inception, more than 45,000 students have signed up for his Natural History course at Carleton University.  Michael, who also hosted an international television series Wild by Nature, is in great demand as a speaker for groups as diverse as outdoor educators, professional biologists, schoolchildren, and naturalists’ clubs both in Canada and abroad.

    Eleven books on a diverse array of natural history subjects bear the stamp of Michael’s passion, knowledge and stunning photography. These include: Moose Country, The Explorer’s Guide to Algonquin Park, Beauty and the Beasts: The Hidden World of Wildflowers, The Howls of August: Encounters with Algonquin Wolves, Natural History, and, his most recent, Dam Builders: the natural history of beavers and their ponds. Michael’s award-winning photographs (three first place finishes in national photo contests), and natural history columns have graced the pages of numerous Canadian and American magazines and newspapers - nearly 2,000 nature columns with topics ranging from near-microscopic Snow Fleas to towering Moose bear his name.

    Michael is also well known for his educational and conservation efforts, for which he has received numerous awards, including an Outstanding Service Award from the Federation of Ontario Naturalists, three University Teaching Achievement Awards (the first to receive that many) and a Lifetime Achievement Award from Carleton University, and The Distinguished Public Education Award from the Canadian Council of University Biology Chairs.