Events & Meetings

General Information

Club meetings are the first Tuesday of every month except July and August at 7:30 p.m. at the Arnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin St., Arnprior (by the Fairgrounds). Guests welcome: $5 per meeting – Students welcome to attend for Free! Guests are also welcome on field trips and will be asked to make a contribution of $5 to our club. (Students are free.) Please register beforehand and always check this website for updates before heading out on a field trip. NOTE: If you join a field trip, be aware that other participants may take your picture, accidentally or intentionally. So the photo may end up on the mfnc.ca or other websites. It’’s a normal part of sharing field trip fun and information. If you don’’t want your photo used this way, tell the trip leader or the field trip coordinator at events@mfnc.ca.  
  • Sat
    23
    Feb
    2019
    8am - 10pmAmherst Island

    Leaders:  Angela and Jeff Skevington

    Meet:  We will leave promptly at 8 am from the parking lot at the corner of March Rd (49) and Upper Dwyer Hill (3) (45.2673910,-76.1266138). From there we will drive to Millhaven where we catch the 10:30 am ferry to Amherst Island. Jeff and Angela will lead the group down but they expect participants to make their own way home after leaving the island.

    Bring: Lunch, warm clothes (including extra socks), snowshoes (optional), binoculars and scope if you have one, $9 per car for the ferry, money for dinner.

    Come and join us as we search for owls and other birds of prey on Amherst Island.  We will drive to Owl Woods where we will hike a snow drifted road for about 2 km (Some people may want snowshoes for this part.) then into and around the woods for about 2 km hoping to find Nothern Saw-whet and Barred Owls roosting in the trees. We will walk the 2 km back along the same road we came in on.  This makes for about 6 km of heavy walking in total. Once back to the cars, we will drive around the island looking for Snowy Owls and Short-eared Owls along with other raptors, stopping to scope species that we find.
    We will leave the island on either the 5 or 6 pm ferry, depending on the birds. There will be a quick stop for fast food for dinner in Kingston. Everyone should be home before 10 pm if we take the 6 pm ferry, maybe even 9 pm if dinner is fast.
    Contact Angela (angela_skevington@yahoo.ca; 613-832-1970) to register. Please indicate the number of adults and children.
  • Tue
    05
    Mar
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Dr. John Percival spent his career at the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) studying the Canadian Shield in remote parts of northern Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and Nunavut. He is published in over 300 journal articles, reports, maps, book chapters and books. John continues his research as an emeritus scientist at the GSC.

    The Presentation:

    Objects from outer space! Meteorites have fascinated scientists since their recognition in 1803.

    Although there is an almost continuous rain of interplanetary dust, regular meteorite showers and occasional fireballs entering the atmosphere, only rarely do objects large enough to excavate craters strike the Earth.

    The effect can be catastrophic when they do. About 66 million years ago, a 10-15 km diameter meteorite travelling at 10 km/second struck the Yucatan Peninsula in present day Mexico, vaporizing rocks within a 150-km wide, 20-km deep crater. Rock vapour enveloped the globe, resulting in the extinction of about half of Earth’s species, including the dinosaurs. This crater, called the Chicxulub Crater, is now covered with sediments and seawater.

    But the Chicxulub event was not the worst mass extinction: that occurred 250 million years ago when about 90% of species disappeared.

    The distinction for the largest visible impact crater belongs to the 2.02 billion-year-old, 300-km diameter Vredefort structure of South Africa. A still larger impact crater (Mars-sized) is thought to be responsible for striking the primitive Earth, ejecting material that became the Moon about 4.53 billion years ago.

    The talk will present an illustrated tour of impact events, including notable Canadian craters: the closest one (450-million-year-old Brent crater in eastern Algonquin Park); the most obvious one (1.4 million-year-old Pingualuit crater of northern Ungava); and the richest one (1.85 billion-year-old Sudbury structure).

    Biography:

    Dr. John Percival who received a B.Sc. in geology from Concordia University and Masters and Doctorate degrees in geology from Queen’s University, spent his career at the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) studying the Canadian Shield in remote parts of northern Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, and Nunavut. He is published in over 300 journal articles, reports, maps, book chapters and books.

    He also served as an adjunct professor (U. Ottawa), on the editorial boards of three international journals, and took a leadership role in Lithoprobe, Canada’s national geoscience program from 1982 to 2002. The Lithoprobe project built a trans-continental 3-D geologic knowledge framework.

    John delivered speaking tours at universities across Canada in 1990 and 2001 as Distinguished Lecturer of the Geological Association of Canada, and in 2017 was awarded the Gold Medal of the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada.

    John continues his research as an emeritus scientist at the GSC.

  • Sun
    31
    Mar
    2019
    7:00 pmArnprior/Pakenham area

    Leader: Michael Runtz

    Meet: in the Metro store parking lot, 375 Daniel St., Arnprior. Park opposite the store but close to the road. We will carpool from there.

    Michael will lead us to several locations where we can expect to find owls. Target species are: Barred Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl and Eastern Screech-Owl. Along the way we will learn about the ecology and behaviour of these beautiful and fascinating birds. Dress very warmly; we will be standing outside for periods of time. Bring a flashlight and binoculars if you have them. The duration of this event will depend 0n the length of time it takes to find our target species.  The number of registrants will be limited so register early for this very popular outing at events@mfnc.ca

  • Tue
    02
    Apr
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Heather Kharouba is an Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa where she studies global change ecology.

    The Presentation:

    Dr. Kharouba’s work and the work of her colleagues has demonstrated that there have been widespread shifts in the timing of species interactions over recent decades due to climate change. However, it remains difficult to understand the consequences of those shifts for communities and ecosystems. Dr. Kharouba will give an overview of what these consequences may be and why it is difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these consequences. She will also discuss how her lab is thinking about some of these issues for species of local interest like the monarch butterfly and the invasive species - the dog-strangling vine (Vincetoxicum rossicum).

    Biography:

    Heather Kharouba is an Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Ottawa where she studies global change ecology. She earned a BSc and MSc at Ottawa U. and a PhD at the University of British Columbia. She also completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship at University of California at Davis. Dr. Kharouba’s current research focuses on how and why species are responding to climate change and what those responses mean for ecological communities, with a particular focus on plant-insect interactions. To learn more about the research at her lab, visit: kharoubalab.weebly.com.

  • Sat
    27
    Apr
    2019
    1pm-4pmTo be determined

    Leader: Matt Ellerbeck

    Check here later in April for information about the exact location and meeting place .  Matt will be exploring various ponds in the Club's area.

    Join Frog Conservationist, Matt Ellerbeck, and members of the club, as we search for a variety of frogs and other amphibians and reptiles! Learn how to properly locate and observe these animals. Wear your highest rubber boots, if you have some, dress warmly, bring a flashlight and a net if you have one. Bring the kids. This will be a very "kid-friendly" event.  Register at events@mfnc.ca ...for more information see: www.saveallfrogs.com

  • Tue
    07
    May
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Our Presenter:

    Brian Carson is an enthusiastic plant hunter and obsessed gardener who enjoys astonishing fellow gardeners with his floral treasures. In the Ottawa region he lectures frequently, leads field trips and conducts workshops.

    The Presentation:

    Not all treasures are silver and gold. In recent years, more and more floral gems are being found here in the Ottawa Valley: elusive double Trilliums, incredible colored Trillium variants, revered double hepaticas, gargantuan bloodroots and many more marvelous beauties. The presentation, a virtual tour of the valley, will cover the discovery of these treasures. Journey with Brian for a while as he unveils some of the floral gems found hiding in plain sight - perhaps, in a forest near you.

    Biography:

    Brian Carson’s has had a varied career that includes farming, market gardening, underwater salvaging, masonry contracting, geophysics and mine supervision. As an enthusiastic plant hunter and obsessed gardener he enjoys astonishing fellow gardeners with his floral treasures. In the Ottawa region Brian lectures frequently, leads field trips and conducts workshops. Last year he received the prestigious Award of Merit from the Ontario Horticultural Association for his work with Trilliums.

    Brian is past president of the Manotick Horticultural Society and the Barrhaven Garden Club and vice president for the Ottawa Valley Rock Garden Society. He is a member of the Royal Horticultural Society, the North American Rock Garden Society, the Scottish Rock Garden Society, the Ottawa Cactus and Succulent Group and the Macnamara Field Naturalists’ Club.

    In recent years, he has had incredible luck as an amateur plant explorer discovering a colony of new terrestrial orchids for North America, many marvellous mutations of our native wildflowers, and right here in the Ottawa Valley, an ever increasing treasure trove of the elusive double Trilliums.

    Brian’s current passions of plant hunting and photography have brought international recognition to the Ottawa Valley for its double Trilliums.

  • Sat
    11
    May
    2019
    all dayBrighton, ON

    Leader:  Doug McRae

    This will be an all-day outing in the park where we will watch for spring migrants. There should be a good variety of warblers by this time of year, along with ducks and many other species of interest. We will begin early in the morning so it is advisable to stay in the area overnight Friday. There are accommodations nearby and camping is available in the park. The group will be limited to 25 members so please register early at events@mfnc.ca and questions may be sent to this same address.  More information will be provided to registrants.

  • Tue
    04
    Jun
    2019
    7:30 pmArnprior Curling Club, 15 Galvin Street, Arnprior, ON

    Dr. Cory Harris, Assistant Professor at the University of Ottawa, will speak on the role of plants in human and ecological health. Details to follow.